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4 Lessons Creatives Can Learn from Quibi’s Conundrum 1
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2 thoughts on “4 Lessons Creatives Can Learn from Quibi’s Conundrum

  1. Great write up. Though let’s be honest, the fact that people like Lynch and other cinema purists are coming from a place of INCREDIBLE privilege is almost always ignored when discussing the streaming vs cinema debate.

    A female director, or male director of any minority background already has limited opportunities all else being equal. Imagine if a director like that wanted to make abstract, commercially challenging films like David Lynch. You’d get maybe one, two films distributed theatrically before the profit motive begins to severely hinder any chances you have for your future projects, if they even get made, to have a traditional theatrical release. You may say, yeah that’s true of ANY director. Well then, imagine how exponentially less margin for error there is for non-white males.

    Every year there are thousands of features rejected at festivals everywhere, of those that even get selected to festivals, not all of them get theatrical releases.. we’re talking some 80 percent of ALL features being made around the world NEVER getting a theatrical release. Does that mean the crews and creatives of these films weren’t “making cinema” or whatever? Do they get demoted to “content creators” or “made-for-TV directors” (said in teasing kids voice)??

    The entirety of the theatrical vs streaming, film vs digital, all these rhetorical exercises do nothing to advance our understanding of the art form we’re engaged in and only further the polarization of culture at large, in defense of strong corporate interests who benefit financially from public perception shifting one way or another. The kinds of people who’ll say, with a straight face, that Scorsese, Cuarón, the Coens, Bong Joon Ho, Soderberg, Fincher, Kaufman, Meirelles, (and the list goes on) are nothing but made -for-TV directors now. Maybe we should stop thinking of cinema as a medium. It’s a language. And whether the purists want to admit it or not, it’s no longer being heard at the multiplex.

  2. Great write up. Though let’s be honest, the fact that people like Lynch and other cinema purists are coming from a place of INCREDIBLE privilege is almost always ignored when discussing the streaming vs cinema debate.

    A female director, or male director of any minority background already has limited opportunities all else being equal. Imagine if a director like that wanted to make abstract, commercially challenging films like David Lynch. You’d get maybe one, two films distributed theatrically before the profit motive begins to severely hinder any chances you have for your future projects, if they even get made, to have a traditional theatrical release. You may say, yeah that’s true of ANY director. Well then, imagine how exponentially less margin for error there is for non-white males.

    Every year there are thousands of features rejected at festivals everywhere, of those that even get selected to festivals, not all of them get theatrical releases.. we’re talking some 80 percent of ALL features being made around the world NEVER getting a theatrical release. Does that mean the crews and creatives of these films weren’t “making cinema” or whatever? Do they get demoted to “content creators” or “made-for-TV directors” (said in teasing kids voice)??

    The entirety of the theatrical vs streaming, film vs digital, all these rhetorical exercises do nothing to advance our understanding of the art form we’re engaged in and only further the polarization of culture at large, in defense of strong corporate interests who benefit financially from public perception shifting one way or another. The kinds of people who’ll say, with a straight face, that Scorsese, Cuarón, the Coens, Bong Joon Ho, Soderberg, Fincher, Kaufman, Meirelles, (and the list goes on) are nothing but made -for-TV directors now. Maybe we should stop thinking of cinema as a medium. It’s a language. And whether the purists want to admit it or not, it’s no longer being heard at the multiplex.

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