iPhone 12 Pro has first camera able to record in Dolby Vision
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jon

HDR brightness is for HDR, which happens to look spectacular on the iPhone 12, better in fact than on most OLED televisions. You seem pretty cynical regarding ProRes, but I’m confident it will outperform more compressed codecs in post.

Last edited 9 days ago by jon
Taikuri

Absolutely disagree. The issue is not whether it’s a compressed CODEC or ProRes. Compressed CODECs from DSLRs routinely outperform what you get out of Phones due to the better, larger sensors and better lenses. This is the issue the writer is pointing out.

Changing a CODEC cannot defeat physics.

I expect the ProRes to look better because it’s a superior CODEC. But I expect that there are some DSLRs in the same pricing segment as an iPhone Pro 256GB that will outperform that same ProRes using compressed CODECs.

I also don’t expect it to be able to touch Cinema Cameras around teh same pricing segment – like the Blackmagic Pocket 4K – when it comes to quality, when that is shooting ProRes (even with a “budget” cinema lens).

jon

There is universal agreement that iPhone clips don’t always play smoothly when editing and that Prores is much easier on your computer’s CPU, resulting in a far smoother editing process than H.264 or H.265. That is one reason ProRes is among the most eagerly anticipated features of the iPhone 13 by the entire community of filmmakers who shoot with iPhones. So yes, ProRes should outperform hugely compressed codecs and it also brings Apple one step closer to offering Final Cut Pro on mobile devices. You’re welcome to disagree, but that would make you an outlier in the entire filmmaking community, of which not a single professional seriously believes that ProRes will bring no improvement in performance.

Last edited 8 days ago by jon

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