Mark Spencer – ProVideo Coalition https://www.provideocoalition.com A Moviola Company Sat, 24 Jun 2017 14:23:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8 https://cdn.provideocoalition.com/app/uploads/cropped-Moviola-Favicon-2016-32x32.png Mark Spencer – ProVideo Coalition https://www.provideocoalition.com 32 32 Ripple Whips & Ken Burns in Final Cut Pro X https://www.provideocoalition.com/ripple-whips-ken-burns-final-cut-pro-x/ https://www.provideocoalition.com/ripple-whips-ken-burns-final-cut-pro-x/#respond Thu, 22 Jun 2017 16:11:07 +0000 https://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=55295 This week on MacBreak Studio, I show Steve Martin from Ripple Training a specific use case for our Ripple Whips transition plugin for Final Cut Pro X. Ripple Whips is a set of dynamic, camera-driven transitions that add customizable camera moves to transitions between clips. And while they work great on video, they can also

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This week on MacBreak Studio, I show Steve Martin from Ripple Training a specific use case for our Ripple Whips transition plugin for Final Cut Pro X.

Ripple Whips is a set of dynamic, camera-driven transitions that add customizable camera moves to transitions between clips. And while they work great on video, they can also be used on photographs. And by combining them with the Ken Burns effect built into Final Cut Pro X you can create smooth, ongoing movement over a series of images.

The Ken Burns effect is enabled by first selecting the Crop tool in the Viewer, then clicking the Ken Burns button. Two frames appear on your image: a green frame for the starting positions, and a red frame for the ending position. You can change the scale and position of these frames to determine where the virtual camera starts and ends its movement while the playhead passes over the clip.

In much the same way, Ripple Whips has an “Adjust Framing” view that includes frames for the outgoing clip and the incoming clip so that you can create a camera movement from one clip to the next. You can move and scale these frames just as you would with the Ken Burns effect.

By combining Ken Burns with Ripple Whips, you can therefore create continuous movement on multiple photographs: pans and zooms on each photo itself, and then a pan and zoom to move from one photo to the next.

Ripple Whips adds an adjustable masked and feathered overlap when moving from one clip or photo to the next so that you can blend them seamlessly together.

Check it all out above. If you are intrigued by Ripple Whips, you can try them out for free via the FxFactory application. Full disclosure: as the developer of Ripple Whips, I receive compensation if you choose to purchase.

 

 

 

 

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Incredible Shrinking Libraries in Final Cut Pro X https://www.provideocoalition.com/incredible-shrinking-libraries-final-cut-pro-x/ https://www.provideocoalition.com/incredible-shrinking-libraries-final-cut-pro-x/#respond Mon, 19 Jun 2017 13:57:09 +0000 https://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=55062 This week on MacBreak Studio, we celebrate our 400th episode! Besides the silliness (which we hope you enjoy), Steve Martin from Ripple Training gives us a very interesting media management tip for Final Cut Pro X. The scenario is one in which you imported your media into a library from a connected drive, but then

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This week on MacBreak Studio, we celebrate our 400th episode!

Besides the silliness (which we hope you enjoy), Steve Martin from Ripple Training gives us a very interesting media management tip for Final Cut Pro X.

The scenario is one in which you imported your media into a library from a connected drive, but then you realize you didn’t want to do that. Newly created libraries default to “managed” libraries, or ones in which the media is copied inside the library. If you don’t change that setting in the Library Inspector before importing, then naturally all imported media will be copied to the library package.

Moving media back out of the library is quite easy using standard media management practices in Final Cut Pro X: in this case, changing the target location for imported media and then consolidating the media to that location.

But that operation places all the media into a single folder. What if the media you imported is from several folders? Then you’ll end up with multiple copies of at least some clips: the originals on the drive, and the ones being consolidated out of the library.

Thus the rationale for Steve’s tip: instead of consolidating the media out of the library, he uses the Relink Media command to simply point Final Cut Pro X to the location of the external media. Since Final Cut will automatically look inside nested folder structures when relinking, you can use this method to relink to media in multiple folders.

The cool (and rather amazing) thing about this process is that once relinked, the media files located inside the drive automatically become aliases, or sym links, pointing to that external media (at least when the library is on the same drive as the external media).

Check out the details above. If you want to brush up on your media management skills, check out our media management tutorial.

 

 

 

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Editing Temp Music in Final Cut Pro X https://www.provideocoalition.com/editing-temp-music-final-cut-pro-x/ https://www.provideocoalition.com/editing-temp-music-final-cut-pro-x/#comments Mon, 12 Jun 2017 15:29:49 +0000 https://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=54760 Do you ever work with temp or watermarked music in Final Cut Pro X? Then you’ll definitely want to check out this week’s MacBreak Studio, where I show Steve Martin from Ripple Training my technique that can save you a great deal of time when it comes to replacing your watermarked music with the clean

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Do you ever work with temp or watermarked music in Final Cut Pro X? Then you’ll definitely want to check out this week’s MacBreak Studio, where I show Steve Martin from Ripple Training my technique that can save you a great deal of time when it comes to replacing your watermarked music with the clean version.

Usually you’ll add a music track to a project as a connected clip. If you need to edit the music to make it longer or short to match your visuals, you’ll find that blading it creates a separate connection line for each cut, and if you move the clip that section is connected to, it will move with it, ruining your music edit.

To solve this issue, simply put the music clip into its own connected storyline (the keyboard shortcut is Command-G). Now you can freely cut it into sections, delete and reorganize those sections, and there will only be the single connection line at the start of the storyline. You can add cross-dissolves, or expand the audio and add adjustable fade handles to smooth your cuts.

However, if you have done all this work with a watermarked version of your music, when it comes time to replace it, what do you do? While you could replace the underlying file, that takes a trip to the Finder and perhaps into the Library package, and relinking the media isn’t always assured. And you don’t want to have to edit the music all over again with the final version. So here’s what I recommend:

After adding your watermarked music to your project, but before creating a connected storyline, first press Option-G to make a compound clip out of the music clip. Then, proceed exactly as outlined above: create a connected storyline out of the compound clip, blade it as needed, delete, reorganize, add cross fades or expand the audio and add fade handles.

Now for the exciting part: double-clicking any section of the compound clip (in its collapsed form) will open it into its own time. Locate your purchased version of the song in the Browser, press Option-R to perform a replace edit (or drag it over the watermarked version), and the media is replaced. Go back to the original timeline, and every section of the music clip has been replaced with the exact same section of the clean version, since they all reference the same media! So with one command, the watermarked music has been replaced with the clean version in the entire project.

If you want to learn more techniques for speeding up your editing workflow, check out our Warp Speed Editing tutorial.

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Exporting Clips Using Frame.io https://www.provideocoalition.com/exporting-clips-using-frame-io/ https://www.provideocoalition.com/exporting-clips-using-frame-io/#respond Thu, 01 Jun 2017 15:30:20 +0000 https://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=54166 Have you ever needed to export all the clips in your Final Cut Pro X timeline as separate, individual files? This week on MacBreak Studio, Steve Martin from Ripple Training shows us how to do just that by using Frame.io. While it’s been possible for awhile to export individual timeline clips from FCP X by

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Have you ever needed to export all the clips in your Final Cut Pro X timeline as separate, individual files? This week on MacBreak Studio, Steve Martin from Ripple Training shows us how to do just that by using Frame.io.

While it’s been possible for awhile to export individual timeline clips from FCP X by first sending the project XML to Resolve, today Steve shows us a faster and easier way.

Frame.io is a file sharing and review service for video. But you can also use it to create local copies of timeline clips.

Frame.io comprises both a web app and local helper app. You will need an account for the website for this process to work. The key is to launch the helper app, go to preferences, and set a local render output location. Note this option is only available for Final Cut Pro X.

Now in Final Cut Pro X, you may want to use the timecode effect in Final Cut’s Effects browser to add timecode and clip name information to each of your clips.

Next, use the Share menu to select the Frame.io preset that gets installed when you download the helper app from the App Store. You then choose a project to upload your clips to (even if you aren’t uploading anything). Choose to export “Clips” rather than the timeline, and click Upload. Because you changed preferences, you’ll now be prompted to identify where you want the local clips stored.

From there, the export process starts, and frame.io waits for all the clips to finish exporting before uploading anything. So all you have to do is cancel the upload! The export process will continue until it’s completed, and you’ll find all your clips in the location you specified. Note that each clip is placed into its own folder, so if you want all your clips in a single folder, you’ll have to do some clean up in the Finder. Also, frame.io outputs a full timeline version in addition to the individual clips, so if you don’t want that you can delete it.

All the good details above. If you want work faster in Final Cut Pro X, check out our Warp Speed Editing in Final Cut Pro X tutorial.

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Keyboard Superpowers in Final Cut Pro X https://www.provideocoalition.com/keyboard-superpowers-final-cut-pro-x/ https://www.provideocoalition.com/keyboard-superpowers-final-cut-pro-x/#respond Thu, 27 Apr 2017 17:51:26 +0000 https://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=51645 This week on MacBreak Studio, I am joined by special guest Noah Kadner from FCPworks.com, who shows us some great ways to add keyboard commands to speed up your color grading workflow. The first tip Noah shares was an eye-opener for me: he opens the Command Editor (Final Cut Pro > Commands > Customize) and

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This week on MacBreak Studio, I am joined by special guest Noah Kadner from FCPworks.com, who shows us some great ways to add keyboard commands to speed up your color grading workflow.

The first tip Noah shares was an eye-opener for me: he opens the Command Editor (Final Cut Pro > Commands > Customize) and then sorts the list of commands by the “modifier” column in order to push all commands that have no keyboard shortcuts assigned to the top of the list. Very smart, and a great way to see any new commands that may have been added in an update that could benefit from a shortcut!

Next, Noah demonstrates the usual procedure for color correction with the Color Board, click and dragging to move the pucks to adjust shadows, midtones, and highlights, and then clicking again to move among the exposure, saturation, and color balance tabs.

If you search for “puck” in the command editor’s search field, you’ll find commands for moving the pucks in the Color Board. Create a new command set by duplicating the default set, and you can assign just about any keystroke to invoke these commands. Noah chose the left and right arrow keys to move to the next and previous puck. Because the up and down arrow keys already work by default to move the pucks up and down when the Color Board is the active window, with these new shortcuts you can very quickly select a puck and move it by keeping your right-hand fingers over the arrow keys.

Next if you search on “pane” you’ll find commands to move from one Color Board pane to the next. Noah assigns the 1, 2, and 3 number keys to each pane.

By combining these two command types together, you can very quickly grade a shot by tapping the number for the pane you want and then using the arrow keys to make your adjustments. And when you move to your next shot, the Color Board automatically resets for that shot so you can just keep going.

It’s a great warp-speed workflow tip, check out the details in the video above. If you want to learn more tips for speeding up your workflow, check out our freshly updated Warp Speed Editing in Final Cut Pro X tutorial.

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Symbols & Symbol Fonts in Motion and Final Cut Pro X https://www.provideocoalition.com/symbols-symbol-fonts-motion-final-cut-pro-x/ https://www.provideocoalition.com/symbols-symbol-fonts-motion-final-cut-pro-x/#respond Fri, 21 Apr 2017 16:54:44 +0000 https://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=50932 This week on MacBreak Studio, I show Steve Martin from Ripple Training a couple of tips related to using symbols as 3D objects in Motion. These tips work just as well in Final Cut Pro X, since both applications contain the same underlying 3D text engine. We have discussed the process of how to create

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This week on MacBreak Studio, I show Steve Martin from Ripple Training a couple of tips related to using symbols as 3D objects in Motion. These tips work just as well in Final Cut Pro X, since both applications contain the same underlying 3D text engine.

We have discussed the process of how to create 3D objects out of symbols in previous episodes such as Episode 309 and Episode 316.

Today, the first tip is about the Emoji & Symbols palette. Although symbols are available here, it turns out that there are many more that are hidden by default. To gain access, you need to click the tiny gear icon at the top left which is strangely greyed out as if it were not selectable – don’t let that fool you, there are some nice surprises hiding there! Many optional collections are just a checkmark away from becoming part of the palette so that you can make 3D objects out of them.

The second tip is about Font Book. While we’ve discussed creating a Symbol font collection manually, it turns out there is a better way – just like in Final Cut Pro X, you can make smart collections in Font Book! You can specify that the smart collection be defined by a “Design Style” descriptor such as Sans-serif, italic, Roman, or even – yes, you guessed it – Symbol! So no need to manually locate and add symbol-based fonts to a collection; the smart collection finds them all automatically.

Once created, this new smart collection is available within Motion (or Final Cut Pro X) when selecting a font. Or, simply copy and paste the symbol you want directly into the Canvas or Viewer.

All the good details in the video above. If you want to improve your Motion skills, check out our fully updated Getting Started in Motion tutorial.

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Using Graduated Masks in Final Cut Pro X https://www.provideocoalition.com/using-graduated-masks-final-cut-pro-x/ https://www.provideocoalition.com/using-graduated-masks-final-cut-pro-x/#respond Sat, 15 Apr 2017 22:30:55 +0000 https://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=50405 This week on MacBreak Studio, Steve Martin from Ripple Training shows us a two useful and quite different uses for the graduated mask effect in Final Cut Pro X. Introduced in version 10.2, yet overshadowed by other new features, the graduated mask effect adds a feathered transition line from transparency into black on top of

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This week on MacBreak Studio, Steve Martin from Ripple Training shows us a two useful and quite different uses for the graduated mask effect in Final Cut Pro X.

Introduced in version 10.2, yet overshadowed by other new features, the graduated mask effect adds a feathered transition line from transparency into black on top of any content in your project. You can adjust the angle of the transition, its position, and amount of feathering all with the two on-screen controls, or by changing the Target and Center parameters in the Inspector. The only other parameter, Amount, adjusts the transparency of the black from opaque to fully transparent.

In Steve’s first example, he has a shot in a vineyard in which the sky is over-exposed. With the Waveform monitor, he shows how pulling down on the highlights puck in the Color board’s exposure pane affects not just the highlights but the full dynamic range of the shot, bring down midtones and even losing some shadow detail. By applying the graduated mask, he is able to lower just the highlights at the top of the shot without affecting midtones or shadows at all.

The second example is completely different: he uses the same graduated mask effect to reveal a title by keyframing mask to move across the letters, slowly transitioning from black across a soft feathered line, creating a very classy reveal. The key to pulling this off is starting off with a title that is over black.

If you haven’t used any of the 5 different mask effects in the Mask category, definitely try them out as they are all useful and can save you a trip to Motion!

Check it all out above. If want to learn more about how to create effects in Final Pro X, check out this tutorial.

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Get back your Molo mojo https://www.provideocoalition.com/get-back-molo-mojo/ https://www.provideocoalition.com/get-back-molo-mojo/#respond Thu, 06 Apr 2017 23:51:13 +0000 https://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=49843 This week on MacBreak Studio, I show Steve Martin from Ripple Training how you can move bits and pieces of your Motion projects to other projects and share them with other Motion users. If you’ve updated to Motion 5.3, you’ve probably noticed that the File Browser is gone. While you may not have used it

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This week on MacBreak Studio, I show Steve Martin from Ripple Training how you can move bits and pieces of your Motion projects to other projects and share them with other Motion users.

If you’ve updated to Motion 5.3, you’ve probably noticed that the File Browser is gone. While you may not have used it much (since you can import media into Motion via drag and drop from the Finder or by using the File > Import command), there was one casualty: the ability to easily save and reuse layers and groups of layers, including any applied filters, behaviors, masks, and keyframes.

Before 5.3, dragging any layer or group of layers to the File Browser created a file with a .molo extension. You could then drag that file from File Browser into a different project, or send it from the Finder to another Motion user. It’s been a convenient way to reuse and share parts of larger projects, like a nicely animated title, logo or background element.

With the elimination of the File Browser, you can still save, reuse, and share these .molo files, but the method has changed. If you try to drag a group or layer to the Finder from Motion, you’ll end up with a .xml file that can’t be added back to a project.

Instead, you need to add that group or layer to Motion’s Library. I like to use the Favorites folder for this. Once added, that group or layer is available from the same Library location for any project. If you want to send it to someone else, you can right-click it and choose Reveal in Finder to locate it quickly.

If you do send that .molo file to another Motion user, they cannot import it from the Finder into their Motion project like they would with a video clip, image, or audio file. Rather, they must first place it in the correct Finder path so that it will appear in Motion’s Library, and then add it from there. In the video above, I demonstrate how you can quickly locate that path.

If you want to improve your own Motion mojo, check our extensive library of Motion tutorials.

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Replace with ambience in Final Cut Pro X https://www.provideocoalition.com/replace-ambience-final-cut-pro-x/ https://www.provideocoalition.com/replace-ambience-final-cut-pro-x/#respond Fri, 31 Mar 2017 14:52:44 +0000 https://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=49432 This week on MacBreak Studio, Steve Martin from Ripple Training shows us a great way to quickly remove audio distractions and replace them with clean room tone. A MacBreak Studio viewer had asked Steve how to perform a “Replace with Ambience” in Final Cut Pro X, and Steve does not disappoint. Legacy Final Cut Studio

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This week on MacBreak Studio, Steve Martin from Ripple Training shows us a great way to quickly remove audio distractions and replace them with clean room tone.

A MacBreak Studio viewer had asked Steve how to perform a “Replace with Ambience” in Final Cut Pro X, and Steve does not disappoint.

Legacy Final Cut Studio included an application called Soundtrack Pro that many of us remember fondly, myself included. One feature of STP was its ability to sample some room tone and then use the “Replace with Ambience” command to remove background noise like coughs, traffic, birds, an ice making in the fridge, or anything that doesn’t belong in your audio.

You can’t just cut these noises out completely because the silence will stand out against the normal subtle background ambient noise, or room tone, that is present in almost any environment. As any good production team knows, you always record this ambient sound in every location because it varies so dramatically from one place to another.

There are two steps to the process: first, locating and sampling some good room tone, and then, replacing the “bad” audio with the sampled room tone. For the first step, Steve uses Filmstrip view in the Browser and makes the filmstrip quite long in order to locate a section of ambient sound, where the waveform is almost flat. He sets a range with I and O (or dragging) and then presses Command-K to assign a keyword to that range (you could also press F to favorite the range and rename the favorite). The end result is that just that piece of room tone is now quickly accessible any time that you need it. Best to find something that last several seconds. In this way, you can create a collection of room tone samples from each of your shoot locations.

The second step, replacing the offending audio, is accomplished with an Overwrite edit. Just set a range in the timeline and press the D key. It’s fast and easy to skim through an audio clip and replace these areas with clean room tone.

By the way, if you audio is connected to video, then just press Shift-3 to make an audio-only edit before pressing the D key. You only need to press Shift-3 once, Final Cut will stay in audio-only edit “mode” until you press Shift-1 to return to audio and video editing.

If you find this tip useful, check out Steve’s Sound Editing in Final Cut Pro X tutorial, fully updated for Final Cut Pro 10.3.

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Working with Photos in Final Cut Pro X https://www.provideocoalition.com/working-photos-final-cut-pro-x/ https://www.provideocoalition.com/working-photos-final-cut-pro-x/#respond Thu, 30 Mar 2017 14:34:59 +0000 https://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=49397 This week on MacBreak Studio, Steve Martin from Ripple Training shows us an interesting way to work with photos in Final Cut Pro X by taking advantage of the editing and filtering tools in the Photos application. If you use the Photos application on your Mac to store your photos, then they will appear in

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This week on MacBreak Studio, Steve Martin from Ripple Training shows us an interesting way to work with photos in Final Cut Pro X by taking advantage of the editing and filtering tools in the Photos application.

If you use the Photos application on your Mac to store your photos, then they will appear in the Photos section of the Photos and Audio sidebar in Final Cut (by the way, if you missed the Audio portion, check that out here). To get a better view of these photos, you can use version 10.3’s new workspaces functionality to create a custom workspace that closes the Timeline and Inspector and creates a nice large Browser and Viewer to work with.

All the categories of photo collections in Photos are directly accessible in Final Cut, so you can choose a specific Event, Album, Smart Album or one of the built-in collections like Years, Moments, People and Shared from a pop up list.

Then, you can filter that view to see just images you have favorited in the Photos app using the pop-up menu at the top right of the browser (were you can also choose to view just photos or just videos).

But this interactivity between Photos and Final Cut is not a one-way street. If you right click a photo, you can choose to “Reveal in Photos”: this action launches Photos if necessary and brings you to the selected photo, which you can then modify it using any of the editing and filtering tools in the Photos application. Your changes are non-destructive, and once saved, the photo in Final Cut Pro X will update to reflect your edits (you may need to select another sidebar category and reselect the Photos category to force a refresh of the thumbnail and you may find the Viewer doesn’t update until you have relaunched FCP X).

You can then drag the updated photo from the sidebar into an Event in one of your active Libraries, where it will properly update in the Viewer immediately.

Now the cool thing is that any further edits on the image in the Photos app will not affect the version in the Event! This is because as soon as you drag a photo from the sidebar to an event, a copy is created in your selected media location. So you can create a different look, and the sidebar will update, drag that to the event, and you’ll have two different versions in your event to work with.

Check it all out above. If you want to edit faster in Final Cut Pro X, check out our Warp Speed Editing tutorial.

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