ProVideo Coalition https://www.provideocoalition.com A Moviola Company Sat, 24 Jun 2017 14:23:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8 https://cdn.provideocoalition.com/app/uploads/cropped-Moviola-Favicon-2016-32x32.png ProVideo Coalition https://www.provideocoalition.com 32 32 Google introduces VR180, a new video format https://www.provideocoalition.com/google-introduces-vr180-new-video-format/ https://www.provideocoalition.com/google-introduces-vr180-new-video-format/#respond Sat, 24 Jun 2017 14:17:18 +0000 https://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=55369 Google discovered that most users of VR tend to only explore the area right in front of them, meaning 180 degrees VR is enough. They are now developing VR180 tools, so you can “Capture the world as you see it”. The recent news represents a surprising move for a company that has invested heavily in

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Google introduces VR180, a new video format

Google discovered that most users of VR tend to only explore the area right in front of them, meaning 180 degrees VR is enough. They are now developing VR180 tools, so you can “Capture the world as you see it”.

The recent news represents a surprising move for a company that has invested heavily in 360 and VR for the past two years, to now assume that VR180  is what many creators and viewers want. According to a post by Frank Rodriguez, Product Manager VR at Google “…we’ve heard from creators and viewers who want to make and see even more immersive videos on YouTube. So, we’ve been working with Google’s Daydream team on a brand new video format, called VR180, that we believe will make VR content even easier to create.”

VR180 does not work if you simply cut your 360VR headset in half and look through it. It’s a completely new solution, designed to offer something that is hard to achieve with 360VR: videos that look, according to Google, “great on desktop and on mobile”. The VR180 videos focus on what’s in front of you, in high resolution, and transition from the flat monitors to a VR experience when viewed with the different VR solutions available – Cardboard, Daydream, and PSVR – which allow users to view the images stereoscopically in 3-D, where near things look near, and far things appear far. According to the information available, VR180 also supports livestreaming videos so creators and fans can be together in real time.

Google introduces VR180, a new video format

360VR will continue to be available, but if VR180 succeeds, it may well become a niche product. In fact, despite all the hype, 360 VR does not seem to be expanding as predicted. Even in one area, gaming where it was supposed to gain momentum, expectation are not as high as before. Facebook’s  Oculus and HTC Vive were not present with a booth at E3 – Electronic Entertainment Expo, a premier event for the gaming industry, this year, and only Sony had its PlayStation VR on show. Sales of the headsets have been lower than expected, although no exact numbers are announced, a situation that the lack of really interesting content does not help to change.

A recent survey from Nielsen reveals that Samsung Gear is the most popular VR system among the general population, at 34 percent, because Samsung has heavily marketed it in tandem with its mobile devices—even offering the device free to consumers if they purchased a Samsung phone.  According to the study, “Google has been the leader in offering a low-cost option to the masses with Google Cardboard, which allows consumers to download games and content on their mobile devices, much of which are free. While Google Cardboard is an inexpensive entry point to VR, only 19% of the population is aware of the device.”

 

Google introduces VR180, a new video format

The creation of VR180 may be one of the steps through which Google will make more people aware of their VR products. Besides the original Cardboard viewer, Google also has the DayDream View headset, which costs $76.59 and is lightweight, designed to fit comfortably over most eyeglasses, with a removable facepad to wash whenever you like. The DayDream headset is used with smartphones, but Google is also introducing Daydream standalone VR headsets, with the promise that you can “enjoy high quality VR anywhere you want with no cables, phone or PC.”

Google introduces VR180, a new video format

Supporting the new format is the first step. Next, Google wants to offer the cameras with which to capture VR180, and they are working with companies as YI, Lenovo and LG to build cameras from the ground up that will be easy to set up and work with as any other camera, with the difference that they will deliver VR180. Those cameras will be available this Winter, in time for Christmas.

Google opened a VR180 certification program and one of their first partners is Z CAM, creators of professional VR cameras, the company behind products as the Z CAM E1 or Z CAM S1. Z CAM’s motto is easy: “VR is all about content. The rest is technology”.

The new VR180 cameras will be as easy to use as point-and-shoot cameras, cost around the same price, and are promised to be tools that are not only great for creators looking to easily make VR content, but also anyone who wants to capture life’s highlights in VR. Designed to offer livestream as an option, they will allow videos and livestreams to be easily uploaded to YouTube. According to Frank Rodriguez, “soon, you’ll be able to edit using familiar tools like Adobe Premiere Pro. From vlogs, to makeup tutorials to music videos – your videos will work great in VR.”

The new video format will work with current DayDream View headsets, which are the base for Google VR experiences. There are lots of Daydream-ready phones available, from different brands, including LG, Motorola, Asus or Samsung, meaning that for users nothing has to change, apparently. Everybody will be able to move from 360VR to VR180 using the same device, which may well be good news in a world where, many times, we are served formats and devices that go nowhere, when the hype is gone.

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Term of the week: Broadcast safe https://www.provideocoalition.com/term-week-broadcast-safe/ https://www.provideocoalition.com/term-week-broadcast-safe/#respond Sat, 24 Jun 2017 12:44:23 +0000 https://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=54250 In the digital era, it’s easy to get lazy about delivery standards. But adhering to broadcast safe standards is an essential part of creating content that’s ready for the small screen. Even if you’re making a webisode, deliver as broadcast safe so you’re ready when it becomes a viral sensation. Click here to watch this

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In the digital era, it’s easy to get lazy about delivery standards. But adhering to broadcast safe standards is an essential part of creating content that’s ready for the small screen. Even if you’re making a webisode, deliver as broadcast safe so you’re ready when it becomes a viral sensation.

Click here to watch this week’s visual glossary term from moviola.com.

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Pond5: a new add-on for Adobe Premiere Pro https://www.provideocoalition.com/pond5-new-add-adobe-premiere-pro/ https://www.provideocoalition.com/pond5-new-add-adobe-premiere-pro/#respond Fri, 23 Jun 2017 16:52:20 +0000 https://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=55361 Recently Pond5 announced the launch Pond5’s Global Partnership program with Adobe as the inaugural partner. Now the company takes another step forward, offering an Add-on that makes workflows faster. The new Pond5 add-on for Adobe Premiere Pro is a free plug-in available through the Adobe Premiere extension panel that makes millions of royalty-free HD and

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Pond5: a new Add-On for Adobe Premiere Pro

Recently Pond5 announced the launch Pond5’s Global Partnership program with Adobe as the inaugural partner. Now the company takes another step forward, offering an Add-on that makes workflows faster.

The new Pond5 add-on for Adobe Premiere Pro is a free plug-in available through the Adobe Premiere extension panel that makes millions of royalty-free HD and 4K video as well as music and sound effects immediately accessible from directly within the NLE.

“When we designed the Pond5 add-on for Adobe Premiere Pro, we knew that one of the most valuable things we could do was help our customers save time while improving their workflow,” states Jason Teichman, CEO of Pond5. “That’s why this seamless integration into the Adobe Premiere Pro CC interface brings users all the power of the Pond5 collection without ever forcing you to leave the application.”

The free Pond5 add-on puts the entire Pond5 collection of video clips, music tracks and sound effects right at your fingertips in the Adobe Premiere workspace. That’s more than 7 million videos and over 1 million audio files that users can try out directly in any project.

The new add-on makes it easier to search files, through the use of advanced filters. Users can enter any search term to browse the collection, then narrow their search by price, duration, frame rate and more. Once a clip is selected, just drag it into the timeline to try it out. Content creators can edit, add filters and transitions, and experiment with as many clips as they like. All changes will be saved when the project is finalized.

Download watermarked comps to build projects, knowing that you don’t need to start from scratch once the project is approved. When an editor is happy with the files chosen, he or she can quickly replace low-res comps with hi-res files by purchasing directly in the app. All of the files will automatically be replaced, while maintaining all edits, cuts and changes. One click will take care of it all.

When you download the free Pond5 add-on for Adobe Premiere Pro, you receive a a free collection of 50 pre-selected clips valued at over $1,000.00, which users can try out in their projects to get started.

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Blackmagic Releases Bluetooth Camera Control App and New Firmware For URSA Mini Pro https://www.provideocoalition.com/blackmagic-releases-bluetooth-camera-control-app-and-new-firmware-for-ursa-mini-pro/ https://www.provideocoalition.com/blackmagic-releases-bluetooth-camera-control-app-and-new-firmware-for-ursa-mini-pro/#respond Fri, 23 Jun 2017 16:02:19 +0000 https://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=55323 Now URSA Mini Pro cameras can be controlled by Bluetooth. Blackmagic just released their new Blackmagic Camera Control which is a free iPad app as well as Camera firmware update 4.4 for URSA Mini Pro cameras. This firmware is necessary to essentially “turn on” the camera’s Bluetooth function. The new firmware also adds some new

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Now URSA Mini Pro cameras can be controlled by Bluetooth. Blackmagic just released their new Blackmagic Camera Control which is a free iPad app as well as Camera firmware update 4.4 for URSA Mini Pro cameras. This firmware is necessary to essentially “turn on” the camera’s Bluetooth function. The new firmware also adds some new features to the URSA Mini 4.6K and URSA Mini 4K. Check out the list of added features found below.

Blackmagic

30 feet, a distance that does not seem like much. When your camera is on a jib or rigged up and out of reach those 30 feet will be very useful. I can immediately think of several times 30 feet of remote camera control would have made my life little easier. Just being able to press record from 30 feet away will be immediately helpful for me. Once the camera is paired with an iPad shooters can turn the URSA Mini Pro on/off, change all major heads-up display settings like White Balance, ISO, Shutter, Frame Rate, and Aperture. You can also change the metadata using the digital slate.

BlackmagicTo make URSA Mini Pro’s Bluetooth support even more flexible, Blackmagic Design has developed a new, open protocol and is publishing a developer API, along with sample code, so people with a little more tech savvy than myself can build their own camera control solutions. The free API and sample code will be available later this summer.

As I mentioned earlier, Blackmagic not only released Bluetooth capabilities to the URSA Mini Pro but also added features to the camera as well as the URSA Mini 4.6K and URSA Mini 4K. The URSA Mini Pro, 4.6K, and 4K cameras get new preset time code options, added support for the Canon 18-80mm T4.4, improved EF, PL, and B4 lens support, and improved digital slate.

Camera 4.4 Update can be downloaded for free from the Blackmagic’s website. Once shooters have installed the URSA Mini Pro’s new firmware they can then download Blackmagic Camera Control iPad app from the Apple app store and connect the two together.

New features for Blackmagic URSA Mini Pro 4.6K

  • Enabled Bluetooth LE module in URSA Mini Pro.
  • Added pairing security passcode in URSA Mini Pro.
  • Added ability to control camera settings via Bluetooth.
  • Added ability to update metadata features via Bluetooth.
  • Added ability to control URSA Mini Pro’s DaVinci color corrector via Bluetooth.
  • Added ability to control camera’s lens via Bluetooth.
  • Added Bluetooth page in camera setup menu.
  • Added Preset record run timecode functionality.
  • Added automatic F-stop and T-stop detection for PL and B4 lenses.
  • Added iris, focus and zoom control for Canon 18-80mm T4.4 lens via EF mount.
  • Added record start/stop for Canon 18-80mm T4.4 with ZSG-C10 hand grip.
  • Added support for Canon 18-80mm T4.4 lens image stabilizer.
  • Improved lens functionality for EF, PL, and B4 lenses.
  • Improved status LED functionality.
  • Improved slate functionality.
  • Fixed bug where focus peaking button did not function in playback.
  • Fixed bug where ProRes 422 color was misinterpreted in some applications.
  • Fixed bug where taking ‘Stills’ did not update used space in media status page.
  • Fixed bug where heads up display disappeared after turning off Color Bars.
  • Fixed bug where scaling on 4” display caused monitoring image artifacts.
  • Fixed user interface bug in media status page.
  • Fixed bug where XLR Phantom Power pad was displayed incorrectly.
  • Fixed bug where UI reported wrong power source when powering up unit.
  • Fixed bug where SD card icon did not appear on the external status display.
  • Updated screen grabs and servo zoom lens information in URSA Mini Manual.

New features for URSA Mini 4.6K and 4K

  • Added safe area guides and false color options to heads up monitoring options.
  • Added automatic F-stop and T-stop detection for PL and B4 lenses.
  • Added iris control for Canon 18-80mm T4.4 lens via EF mount.
  • Added record start/stop for Canon 18-80mm T4.4 with ZSG-C10 hand grip.
  • Added support for Canon 18-80mm T4.4 lens image stabilizer.
  • Improved Zebras for URSA Mini 4K in low ISO’s when using Video dynamic range.
  • Improved lens support for EF, PL, and B4 lenses.
  • Improved slate functionality.
  • Improved Door LED functionality.
  • Fixed bug where ProRes 422 color was misinterpreted in some applications.
  • Updated screen grabs and servo zoom lens information in URSA Mini Manual.

BlackmagicAvailability and Price

Blackmagic Camera Control is available free of charge from the Apple app store. Customers downloading the app must also update their URSA Mini Pro cameras using the free Camera 4.4 Update, which is available for download from the Blackmagic Design website for all existing URSA Mini Pro customers.

Blackmagic

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FREE Symphony Option When You Upgrade & Reinstate Avid Media Composer https://www.provideocoalition.com/free-symphony-option-upgrade-reinstate-avid-media-composer/ https://www.provideocoalition.com/free-symphony-option-upgrade-reinstate-avid-media-composer/#respond Fri, 23 Jun 2017 15:52:56 +0000 https://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=55352 Update your software, reinstate your Avid Support Plan, and get the Symphony option for only $385. Hurry –  Offer expires June 30th! If you own Avid Media Composer 3.0, Symphony 3.0, or NewsCutter 7.0 and higher systems and do not have an active Avid Support plan, there is still time for you to take advantage

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Upgrade Media Composer at VideoguysUpdate your software, reinstate your Avid Support Plan, and get the Symphony option for only $385.

Hurry –  Offer expires June 30th!

If you own Avid Media Composer 3.0, Symphony 3.0, or NewsCutter 7.0 and higher systems and do not have an active Avid Support plan, there is still time for you to take advantage of Avid’s Upgrade & Reinstatement offer, which now includes the Symphony Option for FREE…That’s a $749 value!

Avid’s current Reinstatement promotion for Media Composer owners: customers who have Media Composer systems that were either previously on an Upgrade & Support plan and did not renew or who were never on a plan can get a Media Composer Upgrade & Support Plan Reinstatement for $385.00 and get a FREE copy of the Media Composer | Symphony Option…[continue for more details and to get the deal]

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DaVinci Resolve Mini Panel Review https://www.provideocoalition.com/davinci-resolve-mini-panel-review/ https://www.provideocoalition.com/davinci-resolve-mini-panel-review/#respond Fri, 23 Jun 2017 15:26:34 +0000 https://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=55319 In March I wrote a review of the DaVinci Resolve Micro Panel. I loved it, Studio B, where I often freelance, bought one, and everyone there loves it. A professional quality color control surface for a thousand bucks is a no-brainer for anyone doing color correction more than a few hours a week. If, however,

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In March I wrote a review of the DaVinci Resolve Micro Panel. I loved it, Studio B, where I often freelance, bought one, and everyone there loves it. A professional quality color control surface for a thousand bucks is a no-brainer for anyone doing color correction more than a few hours a week.

If, however, you are grading in Resolve all week long. Or if you’re engaged in gnarly workflows with masking and maze-like node chains, then, in the immortal words of Roy Scheider from “Jaws”, “you’re gonna need a bigger boat.”

Blackmagic Design DaVinci Resolve Mini Panel

Blackmagic Design provided me with a review unit of the DaVinci Resolve Mini Panel, which I held on to for two glorious weeks last month. In that window of time, I graded a few spots and a thirty minute documentary in DaVinci Resolve Studio 12.5. I was working on a 12-core “cheese grater” Mac Pro 5 1 and monitoring a 1080p video signal via a DeckLink Mini Monitor on a color calibrated Eizo CG2730 display. Final output was for web and broadcast, and the documentary was screened via DCP at the Rafael Theater in San Rafael, California. 

I add these details only to note that the DaVinci Resolve Mini Panel fits as a key component of a larger collection of post tools. Tools that until now, have been prohibitively expensive for smaller shops and freelancers. The Mac Pro has long since paid for itself; the Eizo display is about 2 grand; the DeckLink Mini Monitor is 145 bucks and the DaVinci Resolve Mini Panel is just under three thousand dollars ($2,995). All in, you can upgrade your existing editing suite for mobile, broadcast and theatrical color mastering for the cost of a single iMac Pro. If all you’re just coloring for internet and mobile (which a lot of shops indeed are doing), then you don’t need the monitor or output card, just throw all your budget at the control surface. 

So what does shelling out the $2995 for the DaVinci Resolve Mini Panel get you?

The clearest answer I can give you after my two weeks is simple — you will color projects faster than you will with the DaVinci Resolve Micro Panel. If you need to be turning around a large volume of spots, or spend your days coloring long form content, get the DaVinci Resolve Mini Panel. If you’re looking to save money, get the DaVinci Resolve Micro Panel.

Seconds Add Up to Hours

Think of the DaVinci Resolve Micro Panel as a smaller chunk of the Mini Panel. Because it literally is. The trackballs, rings and control knobs on the DaVinci Resolve Micro Panel are in the exact same spot on the Mini Panel. So if you can grade on one, you can grade on the other — your muscle memory transfers just fine. The difference in the two boards and the one that justifies the 2000 dollar price increase are the two LCD screens and extra controllers. 

With the DaVinci Resolve Micro Panel, you have a physical controller (knob, ring, button, ball) for every tool in the Color Wheel Panel along with some shot, frame, and node navigation buttons. With the Mini Panel you have access to everything else in DaVinci Resolve. Things like generating, editing, and placing Power Windows; adjusting curves; selecting qualifiers; and tracking and sizing, can all be done without ever touching the mouse and keyboard. 

A Control Surface for Health and Safety

Again, you can do all of this without either control surfaces. I have graded entire feature films with a keyboard and a Kensington Trackball Mouse. It takes a long time, and after a few hours, there’s pain. Color grading with a mouse and keyboard requires a lot of repetitive motion. Lots of accessing panels, menus and value boxes. A physical control surface offers up instant access to these functions without the repetition of mouse clicks and dragging. Granted, I only had two weeks and a handful of projects to build muscle memory. When I built my last shots, I was twice as fast as I was with the Micro and keyboard.  I was also much less fatigued by the end of the day.

This is the real value in spending money on the DaVinci Resolve Mini Panel. You’ll grade faster, so even under a deadline, you’ll be able to try out new ideas. The luxury of time to be bold and know that you don’t just “have to get it done”. If you’re like me, someone with RSI, then the Mini Panel saves you from pain and numbness.

Please Call Them Something Different

After my time with both panels, I really only have one critique: the names.

This is a simple plea to the folks at Blackmagic Design. Calling one product “Mini” and one product “Micro”, is a little like saying “nano” and “pico”. There’s a difference (nano is 1000x bigger) but no one really cares because they both mean “really, really small”. Same in “micro” and “mini”.  I know it’s late, and the product has shipped, but for the next round, please consider changing the names.

Blackmagic is drawing a distinction between these boards and their Audi-priced Advanced Panel, but it’s too drastic. The market for Advanced Panels is tiny, while the opportunities for boutique all-in-one editing finishing shops is exploding. The product literature says the DaVinci Resolve Micro and Mini Panels are, “… ideal for editors and colorists that need to regularly switch between editing and color grading, or for freelance colorists that need to take their panel with them.” A Mini Panel lets you fly through any kind of project with the speed of a professional, full featured control surface.

You can call it “Mini” if you want, that doesn’t make it small.

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Filmmaker Friday featuring Filmmaker Federico Verardi https://www.provideocoalition.com/FilmmakerFedericoVerardi https://www.provideocoalition.com/FilmmakerFedericoVerardi#respond Fri, 23 Jun 2017 11:13:42 +0000 https://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=55136 With hundreds of careers and opportunities, the filmmaking industry can be a unique experience for a filmmaker. Options include pitching an idea, or a commission through screenwriting, casting, shooting, editing, and screening your project. Filmtools decided to take a deeper look into the world of a Filmmaker. This week, we had the opportunity to speak

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With hundreds of careers and opportunities, the filmmaking industry can be a unique experience for a filmmaker. Options include pitching an idea, or a commission through screenwriting, casting, shooting, editing, and screening your project. Filmtools decided to take a deeper look into the world of a Filmmaker. This week, we had the opportunity to speak to Filmmaker Federico Verardi about his work. This is what he said:

Where are you from?

Federico VerardiI’m from a small town in Italy called Montevarchi located in Tuscany.

How did you get interested in Filmmaking?

Federico Verardi: I started shooting little videos for my dad’s company early on during my summers in high school and fell in love with the process of telling stories with images and sound.  The technology fascinated me; I thought editing with 2 VCR’s and VHS tapes was the greatest thing in the world.  

What inspires you?

Federico Verardi:  Telling stories that move people and question them to change in better ways.

What is your role typically on set?

Federico Verardi:  Director of Photography and/or camera operator

How did you break into this industry?

Federico Verardi:  I started off as an editor in a small TV station in Miami Beach and pretty soon realized I needed to be on set.  I quit that job to join the camera department.  My first job was as a loader on a low budget 16mm feature.  The 1st AC was great and I learned a whole lot on that.  It was a pretty stressful gig having to handle film with no experience, but everything went well and I was very grateful for the opportunity.  I gradually started to step up to 1st AC on smaller stuff. I felt Miami didn’t have enough opportunities for me at the time so I decided to go to LA where I had to start from scratch of course.  After AC’ing for a few more years I joined the union as an operator and started working more and more.  

You walk onto set, what three items do you bring with you?

Federico Verardi:  Light Meter, Letherman, and a flash light (never know when you’ll need that flare!).

When you walk onto set, what’s the first thing you do?

Federico Verardi:  I usually will go to the location and rework all the logistics in my mind for lighting, camera movement, and coverage.  

How do you balance your work with life?

Federico Verardi:  My life is my work.  It revolves around it.  I don’t have a family, just me and my dog, so that makes it a little easier.  

How important is networking in this field? How do you go out and find these people?

Federico Verardi:  I would say very important.  One area I certainly need to improve on.  For me it’s usually been word of mouth mostly, but going to networking events and parties is a huge part of this business, after all we all want to work with people that not only are talented but that we like.

What advice do you give to people working in this industry?

Federico Verardi:  Be humble, work hard, and know when to give your opinion. It’s easy to give up in this field; it’s very challenging. Be patient, work hard, and hang with the right people, it will eventually work itself out.

How do you deal with challenges on set?

Federico Verardi:  It depends on the challenge.  Generally speaking keeping calm is the first rule.  Stressing out doesn’t help anyone.  Problems will arise and dealing with them just becomes part of the routine.  Challenges are the best teachers. 

Do you have a piece of essential gear that you don’t leave without?  

Federico VerardiAs simple as it sounds my shoulder pad.  (I did buy it at Filmtools).  I find myself doing handheld a lot these days and want to be sure to have my own pad to keep my operating consistent.  Even something that small can make a difference in my operating.

Where can people follow you on social, or check out your work?

Federico Verardi:  Facebook: Federico Verardi, Instagram: @fedeverardi,

website: https://www.federicoverardi.com/

Want to be featured as a Filmmaker?

Tell us your story to be featured as a Filmmaker online. Reach out to Filmtools via Instagram messages or tag us in your photos on Instagram, Twitter, & Facebook

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Let’s Edit with Media Composer – Working with Mask Margins https://www.provideocoalition.com/lets-edit-media-composer-working-mask-margins/ https://www.provideocoalition.com/lets-edit-media-composer-working-mask-margins/#comments Fri, 23 Jun 2017 04:13:41 +0000 https://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=55312 In this Let’s Edit with Media Composer lesson, Kevin P McAuliffe talks about a great feature added in version 8.6 of Media Composer, and that’s Mask Margins.  On thing that I always try to focus on in my Media Composer tutorials are “hidden” or tucked away features that may have been added to Media Composer,

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In this Let’s Edit with Media Composer lesson, Kevin P McAuliffe talks about a great feature added in version 8.6 of Media Composer, and that’s Mask Margins. 

On thing that I always try to focus on in my Media Composer tutorials are “hidden” or tucked away features that may have been added to Media Composer, in a point update, but has for the most part gone unnoticed by the community at large and, for me, Mask Margins is definitely one of those features.  Introduced in version 8.6 of Media Composer, it’s a fantastic feature that, at first glance, is nothing more than an overlay that you can use as a reference, when conforming all your timeline’s letterboxed clips.  However, if you dig a little deeper under the surface, you’ll see that Mask Margins are a great way to save you a huge step when cropping and formatting your footage, as the feature is included in your export settings, to bake your new “Masks” directly into your outputs.  Enjoy!

Channel: www.youtube.com/letseditMC_avid
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/LetsEditwithMediaComposer
Twitter: @kpmcauliffe
e-mail: kevinpmcauliffe@gmail.com

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10 years of Lightroom and the alternatives available https://www.provideocoalition.com/10-years-lightroom-alternatives-available/ https://www.provideocoalition.com/10-years-lightroom-alternatives-available/#comments Thu, 22 Jun 2017 18:08:13 +0000 https://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=55300 If you don’t need or don’t like Adobe Lightroom’s catalog, the universe of photo editors compatible with RAW is expanding, with new solutions available in different flavours. Here are some of the alternatives to explore. Adobe’s Lightroom 1.0 was launched on February 19, 2007, to create a revolution amid photo editors, both in terms of

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10 years of Lightroom and the alternatives available

If you don’t need or don’t like Adobe Lightroom’s catalog, the universe of photo editors compatible with RAW is expanding, with new solutions available in different flavours. Here are some of the alternatives to explore.

Adobe’s Lightroom 1.0 was launched on February 19, 2007, to create a revolution amid photo editors, both in terms of tools, interface design and tone. One decade later, with almost every other photo editor following the same essential set of tools and design, the market has multiple choices, something unheard of in 2007.

With multiple solutions available when it comes to RAW editing, users feel that they have a chance to look away from Lightroom, which became the dominant tool for RAW editing since it was launched, a decade ago. In fact, there are alternatives, it’s only because many people have a natural aversion to change that we see so many still clinging to Lightroom, while complaining about its problems.

Adobe’s option to move to a subscription model has not pleased everyone –  to a certain extent, again, because people don’t like to change habits – and companies like Serif, with Affinity Photo, or ON1, with ON 1 Photo RAW, have used the idea of “one payment, no subscription” as part of their marketing campaigns.

10 years of Lightroom and the alternatives available

The rumour that Adobe might stop selling Lightroom standalone version altogether, only offering it as part of its Creative Cloud subscription model, continues to be present in many conversations, and makes more photographers feel that it is urgent to look for alternatives. Mac users remember well the problems created when Apple stopped selling Aperture – not so long ago – and no one wants to be shackled to a program to the extent that changing one’s archive becomes almost impossible.

The problem, though, is that many photographers have created a dependency on Lightroom’s catalog, which is both an asset of the program and, to many, its Achilles heel. The way Lightroom works, you’ve to import images – or their reference –  to a catalog. The catalog works as the central index at your local library, meaning you use it to find a file on your hard-drive, as you would to find a book on a shelf. It worked almost perfectly when Lightroom was launched, because photo storage was mostly created on a drive inside your computer.

The introduction, in recent years, of external drives, offering enhanced portability of data, created problems for many Lightroom users, not fully aware of what the catalog meant. Users moved photos from one location to another outside of Lightroom, but forgot to update the information in the catalog, creating a mismatch between it and the photo storage. The software does provide tools to sort out many of these situations, but the problem, again, is that many users barely touch the manual for the program… until after they’ve made a mistake!

The catalog offers some advantages associated with keywording and a quick search through your photos, besides local previews, but means your workflow is more complex, and, if you do not follow the rules, prone to error. That’s one of the reasons that made me stop using Lightroom altogether years ago, although I was one of the first to adopt it, already at beta stage, and write enthusiastically about the program.

10 years of Lightroom and the alternatives available

Lightroom did change, in fact, the universe of photo editing, but it is by no means the only solution available, and there are, today, plenty of alternatives to choose from. One of them, if you’re within the Adobe universe, is Bridge, which provides the same basic tools, from editing to indexing your files, add keywords and search across multiple folders. In fact, from the moment I stopped using Lightroom, I used Bridge on Photoshop CS6 – which I was already using intensively, anyway – to browse files, editing them in Camera RAW and, from there, in Photoshop.

Lightroom does offer tools that are not available in Camera RAW, and that’s probably one reason to use it, but if you don’t want to go through all the complex creation and maintenance of a catalog, maybe you should stop using Lightroom completely and search for a solution elsewhere. The problem, apparently, is that photographers don’t like to switch to a new system, meaning they will keep using Lightroom, even if they know there are alternatives. But if you’re not using Lightroom to completely manage your photos, it probably makes sense to look for an alternative in terms of a RAW photo editor.

ON1 Photo RAW is such a solution, although, as expected with a program that wants to be a bit of everything  – DAM, RAW and photo editor – it’s not free of bugs that ON1 is ironing with each new release. For those who need a way to index and browse through their photo collection, ON1 Photo RAW offers a complete solution allowing multiple ways to search, without the need to create a catalog or import anything, simply by indexing your files at the source. I’ve tried the system, and it certainly works. It might be a viable solution for those who need to organize their photos through some kind of DAM. ON1 even created a migration tool for Lightroom users to “move” their catalog to ON1 Photo RAW.

10 years of Lightroom and the alternatives available

ON1 Photo RAW, about which I’ve written previously, works as a DAM, a complete RAW and photo editor and a “box of special effects”, with hundreds of presets and the option to create your own. It’s a program that wants to be a complete solution, something many photographers say it’s their dream. The problem, though, is that photographers hate to switch workflows, especially if they have used them for years. The same exact thing happened when Lightroom appeared: initially people found all excuses to not try it. Once they did, the interface and simplicity conquered them. It’s that same simplicity, bettered with a decade of experience, that most of the new programs offer.

ON1 Photo RAW is not alone when it comes to photo editors. DxO Optics have their own DxO Optics Pro 11, Corel has PaintShop Pro X9, Cyberlink offers the PhotoDirector 8 Ultra, Phase One has Capture One Pro 10, Serif has Affinity Photo, ACDSee has PhotoStudio Pro 10, and Macphun offers Luminar Neptune for Mac, which will soon be available for Windows. The list is far from complete, because there are other programs available, some even free. One such example is the recent Topaz Studio from Topaz Labs, presented as “a free photographers editing toolbox featuring state-of-the-art tools, a powerful processing engine, and hundreds of one click effects.” And yes, it is completely FREE.

Many of these programs offer some kind of photo management system, meaning you can use them as an alternative to Lightroom catalog, if you decide to explore the options they offer.  This said, it should be noted that Lightroom’s catalog system has its advantages, and it is mostly due to users not making proper use of it that problems occur. Photographers should consider their needs and how each program may – or may not – be the ideal solution for their workflow.

Before closing this article, it may be interesting to reflect on my own experience. Because I did not like, since very early, the catalog in Lightroom, the last period I used the program I only imported the images to edit,  and exported them as final high-res JPEGs, cleaning the catalog completely after each session or a couple of them, as I did not bother to keep the changes made to each RAW during the editing process.

10 years of Lightroom and the alternatives available

Due to the fact that my workflow goes through the creation of panoramas with multiple images, and Lightroom did not offer that option, then, Adobe Bridge became my interface of choice to select images, send them to Camera RAW, adjust them in batch before sending them into Photoshop to create a panorama. Bridge keeps the changes made in Camera RAW and those changes are kept with the files in your original folder – as Bridge does not create a catalog, but reads the source files – so I decided it was logic, for me at least, to skip Lightroom altogether.

I’ve adjusted my workflow since then, and I wrote about it here at ProVideo Coalition in 2016, at a time I knew, already, I was about to change again. I’ve adopted another solution since, although I’ve still not settled for a definitive workflow. My main photo editor at the moment is Affinity Photo, although I will use ON1 Photo RAW, sometimes. Because I try to keep an eye on new software, I’ve also tried Topaz Studio, which interests me because it is an extension and new alternative interface for Topaz Labs plugins, which I’ve integrated in my workflow years ago.

The options I’ve taken work for me, but are not necessarily ideal for everybody else. That’s the reason why, one decade after Adobe Lightroom changed the world, there are so many solutions available. I sincerely believe that while having so many options makes it difficult to choose, sometimes, it’s a blessing, because we do not all like – or need – the same things.  But if you need or want to change, you’ve to take the first step.

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Ripple Whips & Ken Burns in Final Cut Pro X https://www.provideocoalition.com/ripple-whips-ken-burns-final-cut-pro-x/ https://www.provideocoalition.com/ripple-whips-ken-burns-final-cut-pro-x/#respond Thu, 22 Jun 2017 16:11:07 +0000 https://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=55295 This week on MacBreak Studio, I show Steve Martin from Ripple Training a specific use case for our Ripple Whips transition plugin for Final Cut Pro X. Ripple Whips is a set of dynamic, camera-driven transitions that add customizable camera moves to transitions between clips. And while they work great on video, they can also

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This week on MacBreak Studio, I show Steve Martin from Ripple Training a specific use case for our Ripple Whips transition plugin for Final Cut Pro X.

Ripple Whips is a set of dynamic, camera-driven transitions that add customizable camera moves to transitions between clips. And while they work great on video, they can also be used on photographs. And by combining them with the Ken Burns effect built into Final Cut Pro X you can create smooth, ongoing movement over a series of images.

The Ken Burns effect is enabled by first selecting the Crop tool in the Viewer, then clicking the Ken Burns button. Two frames appear on your image: a green frame for the starting positions, and a red frame for the ending position. You can change the scale and position of these frames to determine where the virtual camera starts and ends its movement while the playhead passes over the clip.

In much the same way, Ripple Whips has an “Adjust Framing” view that includes frames for the outgoing clip and the incoming clip so that you can create a camera movement from one clip to the next. You can move and scale these frames just as you would with the Ken Burns effect.

By combining Ken Burns with Ripple Whips, you can therefore create continuous movement on multiple photographs: pans and zooms on each photo itself, and then a pan and zoom to move from one photo to the next.

Ripple Whips adds an adjustable masked and feathered overlap when moving from one clip or photo to the next so that you can blend them seamlessly together.

Check it all out above. If you are intrigued by Ripple Whips, you can try them out for free via the FxFactory application. Full disclosure: as the developer of Ripple Whips, I receive compensation if you choose to purchase.

 

 

 

 

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