Adobe – ProVideo Coalition https://www.provideocoalition.com A Moviola Company Fri, 23 Jun 2017 04:14:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8 https://cdn.provideocoalition.com/app/uploads/cropped-Moviola-Favicon-2016-32x32.png Adobe – ProVideo Coalition https://www.provideocoalition.com 32 32 NAB 360º Video Report #1 – Bill Roberts, Adobe Professional Video https://www.provideocoalition.com/360%C2%BA+Video+Report+%231+from+NAB+2016 https://www.provideocoalition.com/360%C2%BA+Video+Report+%231+from+NAB+2016#respond Wed, 20 Apr 2016 13:00:05 +0000 https://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=30774 360º video report from NAB 2016 featuring an interview with Bill Roberts, Senior Director of Professional Video Product Management at Adobe Systems. Bill explains the range and depth of Adobe’s Professional Video software and their commitment to including VR functionality into their Creative Cloud apps. They’ve now added an integrated VR viewer into Premiere Pro

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360º video report from NAB 2016 featuring an interview with Bill Roberts, Senior Director of Professional Video Product Management at Adobe Systems. Bill explains the range and depth of Adobe’s Professional Video software and their commitment to including VR functionality into their Creative Cloud apps. They’ve now added an integrated VR viewer into Premiere Pro which makes it real easy to see your equirectangular videos in 360° whilst editing in PremPro.

(Don’t forget to watch the 360° video using the Google Chrome browser at the highest resolution you can – ideally 4K 2160s. If it doesn’t run smoothly at 2160s come down to 1440s or 1080HD. Click your mouse on the video and drag left and right and up and down to see the scene in 360º spherical.)

Adobe’s integrated and cloud based applications make it easy to edit VR, do VFX and audio design all within the same suite. And of course, there’s also the tried and tested Photoshop for all your photos and graphics.

Don’t forget to read my primer article on how to watch 360º videos if you don’t already know.

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Joke Productions shoots, edits, and delivers new Oxygen series https://www.provideocoalition.com/joke-productions-shoots-edits-and-delivers-new-oxygen-series/ https://www.provideocoalition.com/joke-productions-shoots-edits-and-delivers-new-oxygen-series/#respond Wed, 23 Dec 2015 04:30:13 +0000 Joke Productions, founded by the husband and wife team of Biagio Messina and Joke Fincioen, creates and executive produces unscripted TV shows, documentary series, and reality television for major networks. Like many people in this industry, they started working in a one bedroom apartment. Today, they operate a 7,000 square foot studio located in Hollywood,

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Joke Productions, founded by the husband and wife team of Biagio Messina and Joke Fincioen, creates and executive produces unscripted TV shows, documentary series, and reality television for major networks. Like many people in this industry, they started working in a one bedroom apartment. Today, they operate a 7,000 square foot studio located in Hollywood, California near Universal Studios.

Joke Productions, founded by the husband and wife team of Biagio Messina and Joke Fincioen, creates and executive produces unscripted TV shows, documentary series, and reality television for major networks. Like many people in this industry, they started working in a one bedroom apartment. Today, they operate a 7,000 square foot studio located in Hollywood, California near Universal Studios.

After working with Final Cut Pro 7 for years, the company switched to Adobe Premiere Pro CC to edit its new Oxygen series, Snapped: She Made Me Do It. Joke Productions workflow is now 100% Adobe Creative Cloud and the team has declared Premiere Pro CC “reality ready.”

04 JBSign

Adobe: Tell us about Snapped: She Made Me Do It.
Messina: Snapped: She Made Me Do It is our latest crime re-creation series airing on Oxygen. Joke had the idea for the show early one morning while driving to LAX. We immediately cut a sizzle tape that described the show: crimes committed by people who fell into a female mastermind’s web.

Fincioen: A few days later we were on our way to Real Screen, a large unscripted TV convention, where we pitched the show to the female networks and crime networks. There was a lot of interest and our agents ultimately agreed to make the deal with Oxygen. The process from that point took two-and-a-half years, but resulted in the series premiering on Oxygen on September 9, 2015.

Snapped

Adobe: What is your editing background?
Messina: I’ve been editing for nearly 20 years, and I’m the lead and sometimes only editor on all of our TV pilots and pitch tapes. I also do everything from lead editing to polishing on our TV series.

Fincioen: I’ve always edited from a story producer perspective, doing string outs and using editing timelines as more of a workbench. When we got our first gig as showrunners we had to use Avid, but after the show got picked up we convinced the network to let us use Final Cut Pro. That’s how we started building our careers.

Adobe: How did you start working with Adobe software?
Messina: We’ve always experimented with software to make shows look like they are bigger budget productions than they really are. Early on, we realized that we could make our shows look much better by combining Final Cut Pro with Adobe After Effects to composite titles and graphics.

05 Biagio OTS After Effects Office

Adobe: Why did you start looking for a new NLE?
Messina: Networks trusted us to make our own TV shows and we were doing really well, but then Final Cut Pro X was released and it wasn’t what we were expecting.

Fincioen: In an industry that is already running based on a certain way to edit and organize projects, it isn’t feasible to make everyone change how they think, which is what Final Cut Pro X required. So we kept working with Final Cut Pro 7, with operating systems that were several versions behind. We knew our options going forward were Avid or Premiere Pro.

Adobe: Why did you end up switching to Premiere Pro?
Messina: Adobe told us that Premiere Pro could already do most of what we needed to support the intense work that we do. In addition to learning how we worked, Adobe implemented some of our suggestions, such as the “export selected to project” command, in the software.

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Adobe: What do you like about working with Adobe?
Messina: Adobe cares about getting things right for the pro market. It’s clear that people who work at Adobe want to make a product they are proud to put out in the world. We started cutting all of our pilots and presentations on Premiere Pro. What I could do in half a day in Premiere Pro and After Effects would have taken twice as long on any other platform. I would fly through sizzle reels, pitch tapes, and cold opens for pilots.

Fincioen: After more than a year, we used it to cut a two hour special. It involved a few editors, a handful of people in post, and some compositing. After that success, we rolled into Snapped: She Made Me Do It for Oxygen and decided to go for it with Premiere Pro.

Adobe: Why are unscripted projects challenging from a production and post-production standpoint?
Messina: Unscripted projects are among the most demanding types of projects for most editing systems. We often work with thousands of hours of footage, up to 20 or more cameras, loads of graphics, heavy visual effects for our reenactment shows, and up to 50 audio tracks. We also have 20 or 30 people, including editors and story producers, connected to the content. With Premiere Pro, we can be more creative because it works the way we need it to work instead of forcing us into a pipeline.

Fincioen: Cutting an average scripted TV show is definitely less taxing on an editing program. We have heavy, complicated timelines so it was important to find a post solution and workflow that was right for us, based on the kind of TV shows we make.

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09 Kids On House 004

Adobe: What other Adobe Creative Cloud apps do you use?
Messina: Several of our editors know After Effects and have a good time creating anything from muzzle flashes for guns to dramatic time-lapse skies and subtle lighting effects. They have the luxury to try new things and the show looks vastly better for it. The integration between Premiere Pro and After Effects is amazing.

We also use Adobe Prelude CC every day for ingesting footage. Every single piece of footage for Snapped: She Made Me Do It came in through Prelude. We’ve colored one pilot with Adobe SpeedGrade CC and we use Adobe Audition CC for some audio editing, including our podcasts.

Adobe: What did you learn working with Premiere Pro on the series?
Fincioen: We learned that Premiere Pro is officially reality ready. We’d now be happy to do any reality show or documentary series using Premiere Pro. Our investment in Adobe Creative Cloud has paid off in terms of both time and money.

Messina: The series had a ton of graphics, photo-real visual effects, multiple cameras, lots of editors and story producers, and crazy fast turnaround times. Building multicams is something of a joy in Premiere Pro. It’s very easy to swap in other camera angles after the fact if you missed one. The handoff process was also smoother than previous shows. If you like to go to town editing, building graphics, and doing your own sound mixing and color correcting, Premiere Pro is for you. We’ve tried to make Adobe Creative Cloud our base for everything, because the better we get to know it the more we get out of it.

Learn more about Adobe Creative Cloud

Joke Productions actively reaches out to creatives who are aspiring producers, especially Adobe Creative Cloud users. Creatives can pitch unscripted film and TV projects through the Joke Productions blog and podcast, Producing Unscripted.

Follow Joke and Biagio on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jokeandbiagio

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Toddler Fun Learning brings 2D characters to life with Adobe Character Animator https://www.provideocoalition.com/toddler-fun-learning-brings-2d-characters-to-life-with-adobe-character-animator/ https://www.provideocoalition.com/toddler-fun-learning-brings-2d-characters-to-life-with-adobe-character-animator/#respond Fri, 11 Dec 2015 11:25:16 +0000 When Christian Hughes couldn’t find educational video content on YouTube for his toddlers that appealed to him, he decided to create it himself. As the Founder and CEO of a successful video production company, he used his background in animation and video to establish Toddler Fun Learning, a successful YouTube channel for the younger set. When

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When Christian Hughes couldn’t find educational video content on YouTube for his toddlers that appealed to him, he decided to create it himself. As the Founder and CEO of a successful video production company, he used his background in animation and video to establish Toddler Fun Learning, a successful YouTube channel for the younger set.

When Christian Hughes couldn’t find educational video content on YouTube for his toddlers that appealed to him, he decided to create it himself. As the Founder and CEO of a successful video production company, he used his background in animation and video to establish Toddler Fun Learning, a successful YouTube channel for the younger set.

The channel is a family affair, with Christian serving as Creative Director and his wife Amalie as Marketing Director. They also employ talented freelance animators, including Chay Hawes, who work with them to improve the quality of animated content with new tools in Adobe Creative Cloud. Most recently, they started working with Adobe Character Animator, which is available with a download of Adobe After Effects CC, to create charming 2D animated characters.

Toddler Fun Learning

Adobe: Why did you decided to start making educational YouTube videos for kids?
Hughes: I have a video production company, Curly Productions, which specializes in online video content, promotional videos, and motion graphics for clients. After I had kids, educational video content became important to me, yet I couldn’t find anything on YouTube that reminded me of the content I watched when I was young. A lot of the content was hyperactive and used clipart style graphics, yet still got millions of views.

I decided to take a crack at creating some animated videos myself, hearkening back to what I remembered as a kid, but with a modern YouTube twist. I created some animations, posted them on YouTube, and they got more and more views. Today, we have more than 100 videos and 40 million views on Toddler Fun Learning.

Hughes Family

Adobe: How long have you used Adobe software?
Hughes: I’ve been using Adobe software since I was 14 years old. I taught myself Adobe Premiere Pro and After Effects, and to a lesser extent Photoshop and Illustrator. I’ve implemented Creative Cloud across Curly Productions and also use it for the Toddler Fun Learning videos.

Adobe: How did you first start creating animated video content for Toddler Fun Learning?
Hughes: I created the first 10 videos myself. I came up with the idea for Number Zoo when I was on a flight to South Africa and immediately started drawing it using Adobe Ideas, which is now Adobe Draw. I’m not an illustrator by trade, but I thought kids might like drawings that looked like they were drawn by kids.

Number Zoo

I synced the artwork to Creative Cloud, opened them in Illustrator to refine the drawings, separated them into layers, and created the arms and legs. Next, I moved into After Effects for animation and then used Dynamic Link to bring the animations into Premiere Pro where I added the music.

We release one animation each Friday. The software enables us to achieve this schedule. We just started releasing a second video on Tuesdays that is a partnership with Penguin Books. Filmed at the YouTube studio in London, Story Time for Children features live action of celebrities reading storybooks to kids.

Story Time

Adobe: Who is the team behind the Toddler Fun Learning videos and how do you work together?
Hughes: In addition to me and my wife, we have three trusted animators, all with full-time jobs during the day. They enjoy spending some time on weekends and evenings doing something creative. Our channel doesn’t have a distinct style. I just tell the animators and illustrators that the content is for kids and they can be as creative and off the wall as they want. They come up with ideas, create storyboards and character designs, then we’ll create an animatic followed by the full video. It’s a quick process, and Creative Cloud makes it easy for all of us to work together.

Hawes: I initially started working with Toddler Fun Learning on a few nursery rhyme animations, and then we created the Puppy Park series together. At the time, I was starting my own animated YouTube series called Daisy and Fluff. This began as another narrated animation, but when I saw Adobe Character Animator I decided to expand it to include elements of character acting and lip sync to interact more with the audience. Christian and I agreed to do the same for our next Toddler Fun Learning series.

Puppy Park

Adobe: How is Character Animator significant to the work you do?
Hughes: Animation can be quite time consuming and costly, so all of the money we make on the channel is reinvested into new content. We’re always trying to find new ways to create higher quality content on a really tight budget. Character Animator gives us the opportunity to try on-screen character animation with our new series Gecko’s Garage at a much lower cost than traditional character animation, which is really exciting.

Geckos Garage

Hawes: Before Character Animator, we could only do very basic on-screen animations such as adding a wiggle or an expression, waving an arm, or making the mouth move a bit. With Character Animator we can create all of the character’s movement and speech using a webcam. It was easy to get set up with the basic character for Gecko’s Garage. After creating the character in Photoshop I imported it into Character Animator. From there, Christian recorded the voiceover while I generated the puppet’s movements.

Adobe: What are your favorite Character Animator features?
Hawes: Lip sync in Character Animator is huge. After I put the initial time into making the mouth shapes and the character I did the lip sync in just a couple of minutes. Instead of going back and recreating the entire animation whenever we needed to make a change, we just did takes to update features such as the eye movements.

Geckos Garage 2

I also like how I can just move around in my seat and bring life to the character so easily. The breathing tool is also great. Even if the character isn’t doing something on screen, they can still be breathing, which is a simple motion to add that doesn’t require keyframing.

Adobe: What feedback have you gotten on Gecko’s Garage?
Hughes: Our kids are our biggest critics, and we often tweak characters depending on their response. In the case of Gecko’s Garage, their feedback led us to speed up the intro so you meet the characters right away. We’ve also looked at the YouTube analytics and the audience retention for the show is really good, with a 70% watch time and more than 30,000 views to date.

Adobe: What are the future plans for Toddler Fun Learning?
Hughes: We have eight episodes of Gecko’s Garage planned at the point, with a different educational slant for each one. Overall, we want to create more character oriented videos and we have a new series with aliens coming up. Eventually we’re looking at creating content for older kids as well.

Learn more about Adobe Creative Cloud

Find out more at www.toddlerfunlearning.com and www.chayground.com 

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Rise and Shine Films wins Ikan Fly Smartphone Film Contest with “Balloon” https://www.provideocoalition.com/rise-and-shine-films-wins-ikan-fly-smartphone-film-contest-with-balloon/ https://www.provideocoalition.com/rise-and-shine-films-wins-ikan-fly-smartphone-film-contest-with-balloon/#respond Thu, 10 Dec 2015 13:24:43 +0000 Rise and Shine Films describes the video content it produces as “lovingly handcrafted videography.” In addition to client projects such as commercials and corporate videos, the small team also enjoys working on its own projects and trying out new video solutions. Recently, they created the short film Balloon for the Ikan Fly Smartphone Film Contest.

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Rise and Shine Films describes the video content it produces as “lovingly handcrafted videography.” In addition to client projects such as commercials and corporate videos, the small team also enjoys working on its own projects and trying out new video solutions. Recently, they created the short film Balloon for the Ikan Fly Smartphone Film Contest. The sweet film about a little girl who dreams of flying won the grand prize in the competition, and was also the Best Cameraphone winner in the My RODE Reel 2015 international short film competition.

Rise and Shine Films describes the video content it produces as “lovingly handcrafted videography.” In addition to client projects such as commercials and corporate videos, the small team also enjoys working on its own projects and trying out new video solutions. Recently, they created the short film Balloon for the Ikan Fly Smartphone Film Contest. The sweet film about a little girl who dreams of flying won the grand prize in the competition, and was also the Best Cameraphone winner in the My RODE Reel 2015 international short film competition.

The making of Balloon was a team effort at Rise and Shine Films. Jacqueline Passos wrote and directed, assisted by the company’s founders Philipp Andonie and Manuel Imboden. Philipp also guided Jacqueline through editing and Manuel produced and served as the director of photography. Sven Brauchli created a behind the scenes video. Here, Imboden and Passos talk about how they used Adobe Premiere Clip and Adobe Premiere Pro CC to edit the award-winning short film.

Adobe: Tell us about Rise and Shine Films.
Imboden: We’re a small production company in Bern, Switzerland with four full-time employees. We do client work for all sizes of businesses in Switzerland, and also provide production services for other agencies and production companies in Europe, the United States, and Asia. Over the past two years we’ve focused on growing our skill set and the reach of our network.

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Jacqueline Passos and Manuel Imboden

Adobe: What size productions do you generally focus on?
Imboden: Most of our productions are in the medium-size range and we try to be as cost efficient as possible. We try to maximize every dollar the client spends on screen. We also love to make narrative short films whenever time and money allow.

Adobe: How did you start working with Adobe Premiere Clip?
Passos: We started experimenting with Adobe Premiere Clip when we heard about the Ikan Fly Smartphone Film Competition. It was the app recommended to us, and we already use a full Adobe Creative Cloud video workflow, so we decided to give it a try.

Balloon BTS 1
Preproduction

Adobe: What was your production workflow?
Passos: We had a day and a half to prepare for the shoot, and one day for shooting. The first two scenes went well, but we ran into challenges in the park. There were many people there, which made it distracting and noisy, so we were not able to record any audio and made the decision to do all of the audio recording in post. After recording the mom’s voice-over monologue and blending it in with the fantastic piano piece by Carly Comando, we realized that another layer of audio might distract from the story being told, so we decided to not add any foley or ambient sound.

Balllon 2
Production

Imboden: We shot the short film using an iPhone 6 with Filmic Pro because it could capture a higher bitrate than the device’s native camera app, then edited in Premiere Clip on the iPad. Philipp assistant edited, using Premiere Clip to look through the content and note which clips we could use. We didn’t keep any logs while shooting, so all of the selection happened in Premiere Clip. Jacqueline then used Premiere Clip to do the rough cut.

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Jacqueline editing in Adobe Premiere Clip

Adobe: What did you like about working with Premiere Clip?
Passos: I took a very iterative approach and just started playing around with the footage. What I liked about Premiere Clip is that it was really easy to edit with. Having a few years of experience editing in Premiere Pro CC, I felt right at home with it. When I wanted to change the sequence of the clips, I could simply drag and drop them to where I wanted them to be. Freely experimenting with the sequence of the clips allows you to see how the pacing of the story can evolve. When I was finished with the rough cut, I handed it back to Philipp who sent it to Adobe Premiere Pro CC for further refining and editing.

Balloon PremierePro
Phillip editing in Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Adobe: What other Creative Cloud apps did you use?
Imboden: We did all compositing in Adobe After Effects CC, such as removing people from the background and adding lens distortion. We also used After Effects for stabilization of some shots. We created all of the graphics in Photoshop CC and used SpeedGrade CC to color correct the constantly changing light situation in the park and achieve the look we wanted. One fun thing I did in color grading was changing the big balloon’s color from orange to yellow. We couldn’t find a yellow balloon of that size on short notice, so that was one of the rare moments we agreed to fix it in post. Finally, we exported the short film using Media Encoder CC.

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Color grading in Adobe SpeedGrade CC

Adobe: Have you worked with any other Adobe Creative Cloud mobile apps?
Imboden: We’ve been using Creative Cloud mobile apps for a couple of years now. Starting with Color CC and later Hue CC and Shape CC ((all three now part of Capture CC), we’ve found them to be very useful for any task that requires you to be on the move. A very common scenario is when you arrive at a location for the first time in preproduction and inspiration strikes. An app that allows you to capture and store colors, shapes, and movements in that moment in a simple way is priceless and will allow you to carry the essence of your inspiration into the final product more easily. We’re excited to use Adobe Capture now, which combines all of the features of the aforementioned apps into one.

Adobe: How do you see incorporating Adobe mobile apps into your workflow moving forward?
Imboden: We anticipate that mobile editing on the front end with Premiere Clip may become a huge part of our workflow in the future. Rather than clients having to wait to see a rough cut of their commercial, with Premiere Clip we can start editing on set or on the drive home, and have something for them to see half an hour later.

Passos: The strength of Premiere Clip is in the ability to shoot and edit easily and quickly with the iPad, which makes it ideal for location scouting for example. Instead of just taking pictures, you can record the action and assemble the shots right away, which makes it much easier to anticipate problems, add comments, and explain the specifics of the location.

Balloon BTS 3
Production

Adobe: What’s next for Rise and Shine Films?
Imboden: We have a lot going on at the moment. Growing our client work and commercial business is of course at the core of our company’s interests, but we are also stepping up our efforts in producing narrative, fictional content of various flavors. One big project we are developing is an interactive web series called Nordwest, that’s scheduled for release within the next two years.

Of course we’re also working on smaller short form projects, like Balloon. These allow us to freely experiment with ideas and technologies, which translates into more creative approaches for our client work. We’re shooting one short film in December and another one early next year. If time allows, we’d also like to make another smartphone short film for the upcoming Mobile Motion Smartphone Film Festival 2016. There’s a lot happening right now, which is very exciting!

Learn more about Adobe Creative Cloud

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Michael Bonocore tells stunning visual stories through video and photos https://www.provideocoalition.com/michael-bonocore-tells-stunning-visual-stories-through-video-and-photos-2/ https://www.provideocoalition.com/michael-bonocore-tells-stunning-visual-stories-through-video-and-photos-2/#respond Wed, 09 Dec 2015 09:00:00 +0000 Michael Bonocore didn’t come from a photography or visual arts background. That’s nearly impossible to believe, given his accomplishments—first with photography, and more recently with video. He humbly chalks up his success to hard work and luck, but it also has a lot to do with talent and passion. He specializes in travel photography, telling

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Michael Bonocore didn’t come from a photography or visual arts background. That’s nearly impossible to believe, given his accomplishments—first with photography, and more recently with video. He humbly chalks up his success to hard work and luck, but it also has a lot to do with talent and passion. He specializes in travel photography, telling stories using both photos and video and relying on an Adobe Creative Cloud workflow.

Michael Bonocore didn’t come from a photography or visual arts background. That’s nearly impossible to believe, given his accomplishments—first with photography, and more recently with video. He humbly chalks up his success to hard work and luck, but it also has a lot to do with talent and passion. He specializes in travel photography, telling stories using both photos and video and relying on an Adobe Creative Cloud workflow.

Bonocore 2

Adobe: What started you off in photography?
Bonocore: I was leaving the U.S. for the first time at age 27 to go to Costa Rica. I was familiar with Flickr so I decided to search for pictures of Costa Rica and saw some really beautiful images. I immediately became interested in learning how to take amazing photos.

I went to Costa Rica with a point-and-shoot camera and set up my compositions on benches and pieces of wood on the beach. When I got home, I bought a DSLR camera and kept progressing from there. Those first pictures were terrible. When I look at them today, I cringe, but they keep me grounded and remind me that I’m improving.

Bonocore 6

Adobe: How did your turn your passion into a career?
Bonocore: I previously worked as a database administrator, SQL administrator, and QA manager. After I started taking photos, I became active on social media, which led to an opportunity at SmugMug as VIP Manager. I got to know some of the biggest names in photography and managed those relationships.

Adobe: How has your career evolved?
Bonocore: I’ve worked very hard, been in the right place at the right time, and known the right people. Currently, I’m a Travel Editor for Resource Magazine and I recently did travel guides for the print magazine on Namibia and Iceland. I’ve started a travel-specific website, Resource Travel, for Resource as well.

Bonocore 5

I also lead photography workshops all over the world for The Giving Lens, working with international non-profit organizations to help bring awareness to the causes that I am passionate about, mostly having to do with children. Through the workshops, I’ve taught photography to children in countries such as Nicaragua, Peru, Jordan, and India. I’ve also documented the work of elephant sanctuaries in Thailand and helped bring awareness to women’s cooperatives in the Middle East through photo and video stories.

Bonocore 4

Adobe: What Adobe Creative Cloud apps do you use?
Bonocore: When I got my first DSLR camera, I learned Adobe Photoshop Lightroom, and then I started working in Adobe Photoshop. At SmugMug, I worked as production assistant and second camera to filmmaker Anton Lorimer in Norway making a film documenting the work of adventure photographer Chris Burkard. One of the perks was I got to use a Sony FS700 to do some slow motion work for the film. I was comfortable with the camera and also made a super slow motion video for Mavericks in December 2014.

I fell in love with the process of shooting and watching the creation come together. At the time, I hadn’t done any video editing, but I downloaded Adobe Premiere Pro and found that I could put different clips together quickly and make them look really great in a matter of minutes. Plus, it works perfectly with Photoshop so I can combine stills and video easily.

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Adobe: Do mobile technologies play a role in your work?
Bonocore: Yes, I decided to try mobile filmmaking not too long ago and I’ve used Adobe Premiere Clip to edit some of my shots. I created a video of Big Sur that was all time-lapsed clips and cut them together with Premiere Clip. It’s so cool to have a little video camera in your pocket at all times. One of the things I like most is to share short 15-second clips while I’m travelling. People can follow my adventures, as they unfold—not three to five weeks afterward.

I was just in New York and filmed with nothing but my iPhone 6. I’ve got some really cool slow motion and time-lapse footage of the Brooklyn Bridge and DUMBO that will make a great mobile film.

Adobe: Do you plan to continue working with both photography and video?
Bonocore: I’ll never give up photography, but travel bureaus and companies are both moving in the direction of telling stories through video. My passion is interweaving photography and video into one compelling story. My clients know that what I offer is a cohesive story over two different mediums and they see the value in that approach.

Bonocore 1

Adobe: What’s next for you?
Bonocore: I travel seven or eight months out of the year, so right now I’m just happy to be home. I have a lot of editing to do, and I look forward to using more of the mobile apps in Creative Cloud.

Learn more about Adobe Creative Cloud

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Adobe Premiere Clip: Now Available on Android! https://www.provideocoalition.com/premiere-clip-now-on-android/ https://www.provideocoalition.com/premiere-clip-now-on-android/#respond Fri, 04 Dec 2015 23:46:23 +0000 Android users, we heard you loud and clear! We are thrilled to announce that Premiere Clip is now available for Android smartphones in the Google Play Store. Create and edit amazing videos on-the-go. Send your work to Premiere Pro CC on your desktop to refine it with the same video tools used by professionals.  Android users,

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Android users, we heard you loud and clear! We are thrilled to announce that Premiere Clip is now available for Android smartphones in the Google Play Store.

Create and edit amazing videos on-the-go. Send your work to Premiere Pro CC on your desktop to refine it with the same video tools used by professionals. 

Android users, we heard you loud and clear! We are thrilled to announce that Premiere Clip is now available for Android smartphones in the Google Play Store.

Create and edit amazing videos on-the-go. Send your work to Premiere Pro CC on your desktop to refine it with the same video tools used by professionals. Download Premiere Clip for Android.

Notable features of Premiere Clip for Android:

  • Automatically create shareable videos synced to the beat of your music
  • Sync to Music lets you trim to the beat of your music like a pro
  • Change the start point of your soundtrack so you can pick the part of the song you want
  • Photo Motion adds visual interest to static images
  • Two-finger drag on the preview screen lets you do slip edits

Automatic video creation

When creating a new project, you can choose between Automatic and Freeform project options. With automatic video creation, select photos and videos from your Gallery, Lightroom collection, Creative Cloud files, and more — and Premiere Clip will automatically create a video synced to music. Pick your soundtrack, adjust the start point, adjust the pace of transitions, or re-arrange media, so that in minutes, you have something to share.

For more customization, take your project into the freeform editor where you’ll have powerful editing features at your fingertips, including trimming, applying custom Looks, smart audio effects, and more.

Android SelectMedia Android ChooseAutomatic Android Adjust

Sync to Music

Long gone are the days where you’ll have to spend hours editing videos to music. When you enable the Sync to Music feature, Premiere Clip exposes soundtrack markers that are placed precisely on the beats, and the trim handles will automatically snap to the nearest beat so you can cut to music like a pro!

Note: When you send your Premiere Clip project to Premiere Pro on your computer, the beat markers will be displayed on your audio track so you can continue editing to music.

Choose Soundtrack Start Position

Open the Soundtrack panel, add a soundtrack, and slide the waveform to your desired start point. Tap the “replay” button on the preview monitor to hear how the soundtrack changes apply to your video.

Photo Motion

Add visual interest to static images. Turning this option “On” in the Project Settings panel will apply a slow, subtle zoom.

  

Two-Finger Drag

Place and hold two fingers on the preview screen and slide left or right to make quick slip edits that maintains the duration and position of the clip within your sequence, but allows you to choose a different portion within your video clip. Read up on this feature here.

 

Creative Cloud 2015 Fall Announcements

For more information about the latest versions of all of our professional video and audio applications, visit:

What’s New for Video and Audio Tools

Premiere Pro CC

After Effects CC

Adobe Media Encoder CC

Audition CC

Download and install these applications today using the Creative Cloud desktop application or online fromhttp://www.adobe.com/creativecloud.html.

  

Let us know what you think!

If you enjoy using Premiere Clip, please share a nice review in the Play Store. It really helps and is always appreciated!

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Andrew Chastney, one year, one stunning documentary https://www.provideocoalition.com/andrew-chastney-one-year-one-stunning-documentary/ https://www.provideocoalition.com/andrew-chastney-one-year-one-stunning-documentary/#respond Fri, 27 Nov 2015 08:09:02 +0000 Documentary Film Editor and Director Andrew Chastney’s passion for natural history is clear in the work he’s done for the BBC, Disney Nature, Animal Planet, and National Geographic. Most recently, he explored the magical secrets of Iceland for the BBC documentary, Iceland: Land of Ice and Fire, which tells the story of the animals, people,

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Documentary Film Editor and Director Andrew Chastney’s passion for natural history is clear in the work he’s done for the BBC, Disney Nature, Animal Planet, and National Geographic. Most recently, he explored the magical secrets of Iceland for the BBC documentary, Iceland: Land of Ice and Fire, which tells the story of the animals, people, and land that make up this wild island. Andy used Adobe Creative Cloud to help create the ambitious documentary, which aired on the BBC in May 2015.

Documentary Film Editor and Director Andrew Chastney’s passion for natural history is clear in the work he’s done for the BBC, Disney Nature, Animal Planet, and National Geographic. Most recently, he explored the magical secrets of Iceland for the BBC documentary, Iceland: Land of Ice and Fire, which tells the story of the animals, people, and land that make up this wild island. Andy used Adobe Creative Cloud to help create the ambitious documentary, which aired on the BBC in May 2015.

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Adobe: How did you get your start?
Chastney: I began working in film as a runner. I worked my way up to editor doing commercials, promos, and corporate videos. Then I moved to Bristol and began working on a range of broadcast documentaries. Planet Earth and Frozen Planet were landmark shows I worked on where you see animals behaving in incredible ways. Great Bear Stakeout followed brown bears in Alaska and took a narrative storytelling approach. That project was my first time using Adobe Premiere Pro, largely because of its integration with Adobe After Effects.

Adobe: What inspired you to create Iceland: Land of Ice and Fire?
Chastney: The population of Iceland is only about 300,000 people, mostly hardy and delightful proper Vikings. It is a harsh environment where the people have a strong connection to the land and make their living with the help of animals. Iceland is overwhelmingly stunning. It’s a photographic dream with some fabulous wildlife.

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Adobe: Can you tell us more about the film?
Chastney: The documentary follows three animal stories and the people attached to them. One is about a mother rearing her brood of adorable Arctic fox pups. Another showcases an eider duck farmer who rears hundreds of ducklings and gathers the valuable eider down from their nests. The last story is about farmers who use wild Icelandic horses to round up sheep in the Icelandic highlands. We follow them through the course of a year, seeing their highs and lows as they live their daily lives in this harsh but beautiful landscape.

Adobe: What was the best part of filming?
Chastney: All of it! I guess the bit that stuck in my mind most was the last bit of the film, which is very much centered on the volcanology of Iceland. It is located where the North American and European plates meet, so there is lots of volcanic activity. While we were there, the largest eruption of lava in 200 years occurred, at Holuhraun in the Central Highlands.

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The volcanoes in Iceland are not all conical, some are giant fissures in the earth. The eruption at Holuhraun was essentially a 1.5km crack in the ground, like a giant cut in the earth’s crust. There were fountains of lava shooting 100 meters in the air and rivers of lava flowing across the plateau. The Lava flow ultimately covered 88 square kilometers—well over the size of Manhattan Island. The noise was deafening and the heat was overwhelming. On the order of 20,000 earthquakes happened over a three to four week period. The entire experience was so surreal. It was such a once in a lifetime event and I kept thinking, “I’m so lucky I get to do this job!”

Adobe: How did you use Adobe Creative Cloud to help tell these amazing stories?
Chastney: As director, I started scripting and planning in Adobe Story CC Plus. Documentaries have so many characters and multiple scripts and storyboards so having them in one place was tremendously useful. When I was in the UK I could update the Story file and the cameraman and assistant cameraman in Iceland could immediately see the changes. The same was true when I was in Iceland and needed to show my boss what we were planning.

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Adobe: What other components of Creative Cloud came into play?
Chastney: We used Adobe Prelude CC on location for all of our transcoding. We shot on everything from Sony F55 CineAlta to Canon EOS C300s and tons of GoPros. We also used timelapse kits. With Adobe Prelude CC, we combined and digitized everything in the field. This turned out to be incredibly powerful because we were able to take one Pegasus RAID storage array with our digital assets straight through from the offline to Big Bang, a post house in Bristol, for the online for finishing.

Adobe Premiere Pro CC and Adobe SpeedGrade CC were both central to the project. I did all of the offline editing in Premiere Pro, then the finishing was done with a combination of After Effects CC and Premiere Pro CC. I’m not a color grader, but the guys at Big Bang were really happy to use SpeedGrade and I was impressed with its performance and the results.

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We did some experimenting, with the grader at Big Bang doing test grades for me and mailing a LUT, which I’d then apply to the footage in the offline. It was a really fluid way of working and something I can see being really useful on future projects. All of the music and its track layup were done in Adobe Audition CC. Big Bang also did the online in Premiere Pro, SpeedGrade, and After Effects and the results are really stunning.

Adobe: How have you seen Adobe desktop apps evolve over the past few years?
Chastney: In just a few short years we’ve gone from testing Adobe video apps on the Great Bear Stakeout project to using Creative Cloud to take a project from start to finish, from scripting through to final posting. Overall, I am so comfortable with how the apps all works so well together. Creative Cloud makes sense from a cost point of view, because you don’t have to cobble together a lot of different pieces of software that may not integrate well.

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Adobe: How would you summarize the importance of Adobe Creative Cloud?
Chastney: Everyone in filmmaking is under tremendous pressure to create higher quality work cost effectively. Creative Cloud is the secret to making that happen. A daily hire cost is measured in terms of the cost of the actual kit, which is lower with Creative Cloud. The other side of cost savings is realized by streamlining the workflow and spending less time waiting for stages, such as the conform from offline to online. Previously, that could take a week but with Creative Cloud we can just pick up the drive and move it immediately, which is massively valuable.

I’ll be using it again on my next projects: a film about the effects of climate change on Polar bears and other wildlife, and on the graphics-heavy BBC TV show Skyworld.

Learn more about Adobe Creative Cloud

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Premiere Bro goes to Adobe Video World https://www.provideocoalition.com/premiere-bro-goes-to-adobe-video-world/ https://www.provideocoalition.com/premiere-bro-goes-to-adobe-video-world/#respond Mon, 16 Nov 2015 09:15:24 +0000 When I first heard of Adobe Video World, I thought “What is this place and how do I get there?” I envisioned a planet, not unlike Coruscant from Star Wars, where Adobe Jedis convene and discuss disturbances in the force. Come to learn this year’s Adobe Video World conference is the first of its kind,

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When I first heard of Adobe Video World, I thought “What is this place and how do I get there?” I envisioned a planet, not unlike Coruscant from Star Wars, where Adobe Jedis convene and discuss disturbances in the force. Come to learn this year’s Adobe Video World conference is the first of its kind, combining the successes of past Premiere Pro World and After Effects World Conferences into one 6-day Adobe galaxy… far far away in San Jose. [Star Wars theme plays.]

When I first heard of Adobe Video World, I thought “What is this place and how do I get there?” I envisioned a planet, not unlike Coruscant from Star Wars, where Adobe Jedis convene and discuss disturbances in the force. Come to learn this year’s Adobe Video World conference is the first of its kind, combining the successes of past Premiere Pro World and After Effects World Conferences into one 6-day Adobe galaxy… far far away in San Jose. [Star Wars theme plays.]

welcome to avw slide 03

I have one regret as a Premiere Pro user and that is having not started cutting with it sooner. I am a “switcher”. Like many, I moved to Premiere Pro in the wake of FCP7, which coincided nicely with getting hired as the video editor for JK Design, a Creative Cloud based full-service agency. I very quickly realized the powers of Premiere Pro; it empowered me to edit the way I wanted to and it came with the entire collection of Creative Cloud desktop and mobile applications. It wasn’t long before I started evangelizing and Premiere Bro was spawned.

1000x1000 premiere bro logo

So I am going to Adobe Video World and I couldn’t be more excited! I have the opportunity to collaborate with Adobe’s social media team to help promote Adobe Video World and, in doing so, accomplish my #1 goal: to enrich the Premiere Pro editing experience and user community. This is my first event of this nature and, not wanting to look like Jar Jar Binks away from Naboo, I decided it would be a good time to dig a little deeper into the “About” pages surrounding Adobe Video World.

Perhaps you’re like me in that you’d be surprised to learn that Adobe Video World is not put on by Adobe. It’s actually produced by a company called Future Media Concepts, a “premier” (pun intended) Adobe software training center with a growing number of national and international locations. They are certified in other post production software too but I forget their names… 🙂 Knowing Adobe Video World is the product of Future Media Concepts really boosts its authenticity score. It’s not like a manufacturer pushing its products at its own event. Instead, these are Adobe video community leaders who are producing this event for the benefit of the Adobe video community.

If Chris Pratt walked by me, it might come up at the dinner table. But if Walter Murch walked by me, I’d be like “Duuuude! The worst part of Adobe’s monthly subscription is not having a Premiere Pro disc case for you to sign!” So I admit I get a little starstruck when it comes to the post production and Adobe training industries. It’s cool to connect the dots by seeing familiar names like Jeff Greenberg, Nick Harauz, and Luisa Winters are associated with FMC and will be speaking at Adobe Video World. I’m particularly excited to attend some of their sessions such as:

The worst part of Adobe Video World is, by far, having to decide between such great sessions! This conference needs to be another six days.

Combining the Premiere Pro World and After Effects World Conferences allows two days of overlap where editors, motion graphics and animation designers can mingle. Let’s just call these the Dynamic Link days, OK? Personally, as an editor that increasingly has to wear many hats—a.k.a After Effects and Audition—I’m thrilled to expand my skill set by attending some After Effects sessions. Thanks to Dynamic Link, After Effects is basically another Premiere Pro panel but fancier.

If you’re not able to attend Adobe Video World, it’s my aim to make it feel like you’re not missing out, but still whet your appetite for attending next year. Follow Adobe’s social media streams (Premiere Pro on Facebook/Twitter, After Effects on Facebook/Twitter, and Adobe Video & Audio on Facebook/Twitter) as well as @premierebro and premierebro.com for live updates and content.

If you are going to Adobe Video World, I look forward to seeing you there! I love making connections via social media, but making real-life Friend Requests and Likes are so much better.

sean schools profile

Please send feedback/changes to Sean Schools at premierebro@gmail.com.

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Jayse Hansen helps movie audiences suspend reality https://www.provideocoalition.com/jayse-hansen-helps-movie-audiences-suspend-reality/ https://www.provideocoalition.com/jayse-hansen-helps-movie-audiences-suspend-reality/#respond Tue, 03 Nov 2015 06:27:46 +0000 Jayse Hansen is a sought-after fictional UI designer and animator who learned his trade not in school, but through books and from other great designers. After working in print and web design, he taught himself Adobe After Effects and set his sights on a career in the film industry. Jayse Hansen is a sought-after fictional

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Jayse Hansen is a sought-after fictional UI designer and animator who learned his trade not in school, but through books and from other great designers. After working in print and web design, he taught himself Adobe After Effects and set his sights on a career in the film industry.

Jayse Hansen is a sought-after fictional UI designer and animator who learned his trade not in school, but through books and from other great designers. After working in print and web design, he taught himself Adobe After Effects and set his sights on a career in the film industry.

Jayse and bella at park

Ten years later with a string of blockbusters under his belt, including XMen Origins: Wolverine, Iron Man 3, Ender’s Game, and Robocop, he still enjoys the unique challenges each project presents. He now also consults with companies exploring augmented reality and virtual reality technologies that may someday make his amazing fictional creations available for real-world applications.

Adobe: How did you get your start in the film industry?
Hansen: I was doing motion design and commercial work when a friend of mine showed me his reel. It was full of film UI work and I thought that would be the most awesome job. A while later I booked a commercial for Intel and pitched the idea of including futuristic interfaces. I shared that work with my friend and he started referring me for jobs. It took a while to break into the film industry, but I eventually made it!

robo in AE

Adobe: How does your early love of design apply to what you do today?
Hansen: I’ve always liked drawing and photography—design is a combination of the two. When I was young I would create engineering drawings and blueprints that broke down the inside structure of things. Through photography I learned all about composition, color, and lighting. Both of those early explorations apply to the work I do now. 

For example, when I’m compositing a holograph, such as a part of the Iron Man suit, it is transparent so I’m designing the inside structure and showing the breakdown of how it works. When I’m putting that into a shot and compositing, I’m thinking about the lighting, contrast, and composition. I put everything to work in After Effects and it is both artistic and technical at the same time. 

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Adobe: What were some of your first projects?
Hansen: Trust is very important in the film industry. Everyone who is hiring is on the line, things move at a fast pace, and artists can sometimes be flakey. So I was very grateful when Gladys Tong at G-Creative took a chance and gave me a job working on XMen Origins: Wolverine and 2012. I created a few hero screens, which display full screen and tell a part of the story. It was cool that my first job was creating hero screens instead of something in the background that would get blurred out.

DeadpoolLayout r6d

Along the way, I met Stephen Lawes and Sean Cushing at Cantina Creative. We struck up a friendship and that led to my working with them on Avengers and many other films. I still work with both studios today.

Adobe: Tell us about your work on The Hunger Games: Mockingjay 1 with Cantina Creative.
Hansen: I was involved on set in Atlanta while they were filming, using Adobe Illustrator and After Effects to create the graphics that played on the computer screens while they were filming. I talked to some old-school hackers to get ideas of what to show on some key analysis and hacking screens in the film.

BeeTee jayseHansen

We also did the post work on the film, replacing screens with more story-specific versions, as well as creating all of the holographic effects using After Effects and CINEMA 4D. I used to always create temp or slap comps using Illustrator and Photoshop to show the screens and comps with the actors. I’ve now started going straight from Illustrator to After Effects where I’ll do a quick mock up. If it gets approved, we can just hand it off to artists and they have all of the settings to begin animating, tracking shots, and rotoscoping right away.

Screenshot 2014 11 24 07.37.41

Adobe: Have you worked on projects on your own as well?
Hansen: I love working with companies and being part of teams, so there are only a few films that I’ve done on my own. One example is Big Hero 6, which is probably the film I’m most proud of because it’s Disney and it was so good! I was contacted by Paul Felix, a legendary Disney Art Director. He said they were working on a new film, had stuff from my website on their inspiration boards, and were big fans.

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I never thought I’d work on an animated film because most of my stuff is so realistic. But when I found out that they wanted me to work on holograms and UI screens it was perfect. They knew I worked in After Effects and Cinema 4D so they had me concept out a ton of stuff and deliver a kitbash that they could take modules from to use throughout the film. Bruce Wright was the visual effects artist who took what I created and gave it a Disney look.

Adobe: What did you do with Cantina Creative for the film Pixels?
Hansen: The filmmakers wanted us to put Easter eggs into the military interface that referenced Galaga, Pac-Man, or other old-school video games while still maintaining a hard-core, no-nonsense look. I recreated all of the Galaga icons and made them more military looking and designed controllers for their video feed that were shaped like old school video game controllers.

Adobe: What do you like about working with After Effects CC?
Hansen: I love being able to go to JavaScript writers, tell them what I need, and have them write a script or develop a plug-in for it. I also love how After Effects can work with graphics and animation of graphics so well, and then become a compositor at the same time. It is definitely my bread and butter, my main program. If I had to cut out everything else and I only had one program, After Effects would be it. It’s really one of those great tools.

Adobe: How are you starting to work with augmented and virtual reality?
Hansen: There are few companies that have reached out to me. One that is really intriguing is called Meta. They are being super ambitious, wanting to do transparent, which is a lot harder than virtual reality. They want to make it possible to reach out and grab digital data and move it around. It’s a lot like how we’ve been designing stuff for Iron Man and Enders’ Game, but they’re looking for real-life applications.

scoreBoard film jayseHansen

I’m consulting with their design teams, doing concepts and mock ups in After Effects and Cinema 4D that their development team can replicate. Digital holograms are going to be a big new thing. Just imagine a doctor having access to a patient’s heart rate and other digital data without using a screen or needing to touch anything. It’s very surreal.

Learn more about Adobe Creative Cloud

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Cantina Creative, setting the scene https://www.provideocoalition.com/cantina-creative-setting-the-scene/ https://www.provideocoalition.com/cantina-creative-setting-the-scene/#respond Wed, 28 Oct 2015 07:45:33 +0000 For the talented team at Cantina Creative, hanging out with superheroes or spending time immersed in future worlds is just a typical day at the office. The studio produces monitor replacements, matte paintings, heads-up displays, set extension composites, and other amazing visual effects for some of the world’s most action-packed science fiction and comic book-based

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For the talented team at Cantina Creative, hanging out with superheroes or spending time immersed in future worlds is just a typical day at the office. The studio produces monitor replacements, matte paintings, heads-up displays, set extension composites, and other amazing visual effects for some of the world’s most action-packed science fiction and comic book-based films. Working for companies such as Marvel and Lionsgate, Cantina Creative’s animation and visual effects veteran and Co-Owner Stephen Lawes regularly applies his visual storytelling expertise to blockbuster feature films.

For the talented team at Cantina Creative, hanging out with superheroes or spending time immersed in future worlds is just a typical day at the office. The studio produces monitor replacements, matte paintings, heads-up displays, set extension composites, and other amazing visual effects for some of the world’s most action-packed science fiction and comic book-based films. Working for companies such as Marvel and Lionsgate, Cantina Creative’s animation and visual effects veteran and Co-Owner Stephen Lawes regularly applies his visual storytelling expertise to blockbuster feature films.

Adobe: Can you tell us about some of your recent blockbuster projects?
Lawes: It’s been a busy year. We worked on The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1 and we’re currently working on The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 2. For Avengers: Age of Ultron we did a lot of HUDs, monitor graphics, and comps. Another really interesting project for us was Furious Seven. We also completed 23 design and graphics shots for Pixels.

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Adobe: Is this work being done using Adobe Creative Cloud?
Lawes: Absolutely, we use Adobe After Effects CC, Illustrator CC, and Photoshop CC on nearly every shot. We use them for everything from initial design and animation of graphics to on-set and post material. We’re also doing more holographic displays, too, using a combination of After Effects and CINEMA 4D.

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Adobe: How do you see the latest release of After Effects CC impacting your workflow?
Lawes: We have a rig that we built and have refined over the years since our work on Iron Man 2. For Avengers: Age of Ultron we gave it a refresh to make it simpler and faster so it is easier for artists to animate and navigate. One of the most complex rig shots we had revolved around the Mark 44 suit. It’s like a suit within a suit, so the comps were very heavy and it was hard to navigate around them and even animate simple things.

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I tested this shot with the redesigned rig and saw incredible performance improvements. With 32-bit comps, we saw a three-fold speed increase playing back and reviewing content, and with 8-bit comps it was 13 times faster. That’s really a game-changer for us. It is a 62 frame shot that previously took 39 minutes to RAM preview so we would just do it in small chunks. The latest release of After Effects CC reduced that time to just three minutes, which is just incredible. That kind of speed will be insanely good on the next projects.

Beyond refining the rig, we’re also doing a lot more work that requires a combination of CINEMA 4D and After Effects CC as we move into doing more stereo, 3D work.

Adobe: What type of work did you do for the Hunger Games films?
Lawes: These projects were interesting because we don’t usually do onset playback graphics, but we were lucky enough to come onboard early and worked with the Director and Production Designer to create graphics that displayed on monitors as they were shooting, rather than shooting with blue or green screens and replacing the monitors in post.

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In Mockingjay – Part 1, District 13 has a giant, 40-foot wide monitor that provides most of the light in the shot. We did the playback graphics on that screen to generate the correct color and lighting rather than flooding the scene with blue or green. In post, we replaced what was there with design material and still ended up doing a lot of rotoscoping using After Effects, but it gave us a better lighting scenario to start with.

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Adobe: How was the Furious Seven project?
Lawes: We started off doing design for monitor graphics. We came into the production early, so we started influencing some of the storytelling elements of the film. We created content that they could use for bridging the edits. One of the big storytelling elements we helped create was the God’s Eye, which is a surveillance device that characters in the movie use to locate people and wrestle for control.

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Adobe: From an insider’s perspective, what do you think of the increasing use of visual effects in film?
Lawes: Technology has been changing the way people tell stories in film for a long time. It influences how we all approach a story artistically and creatively but I think one of the biggest challenges going forward is how to use this technology wisely. Now that we can pretty much create anything with incredible detail and realism in CG, filmmakers shouldn’t get lazy and use it as a crutch to fix story lines. Sometimes the best approach involves a lack of money. It forces you to be more creative.

Adobe: What is next for you and Cantina Creative?
Lawes: We’re always pushing ourselves to evolve as a studio, so in between projects we work on internal ideas as a way to test out design and story concepts. Ideally, these concepts incorporate all the aspects of our studio including editorial, visual effects, and color correction. Ultimately, these ideas will hopefully benefit a movie project in the future, or could take on a life of its own.

Learn more about Adobe Creative Cloud

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