A 1981 graduate of the Boston University College of Communication, Bruce A. Johnson got his first job in broadcast television at WFTV, an ABC affiliate in Orlando, FL. While there, he rose through the ranks from teleprompter operator to videographer, editor, producer and director of many different types of programming. It was in the early 1980’s that he bought his first computer – a Timex/Sinclair 1000 – a device he hated so much, he promptly exchanged it for an Atari 400. But the bug had bitten hard. In 1987, Johnson joined Wisconsin Public Television in Madison as a videographer/editor, and still works there to the present day. His responsibilities have grown, however, and now include research and presentations on the issues surrounding the digital television transition, new consumer technology and the use of public television spectrum in homeland security. He freelances through his company Painted Post MultiMedia, and has written extensively for magazines including DV and Studio Monthly.

The Passing Of A Local Legend

I’m not a very sentimental guy, usually. The trajectory of people’s lives is fairly common – we get born, we live, we pass away. It&#8217…

The Best Five Bucks You’ll Ever Spend

The Best Five Bucks You’ll Ever Spend

Greetings from sunny Florida. The family has run away from the 90+” of snow in Madison for a mini-family reunion this weekend. Of course, it can’t…

Funny, It Wasn’t Just Me.

So I’m sitting around the house Sunday night after a nice day of skiing with the family, and the Oscars are on. I’m kinda listening with…

Of Mad Monks And High School Rock Bands

It’s really easy to fall into the mindset that “TV production is TV production.” Hey, I’ve been doing this for 25 years now, and…

Is PBS Still Necessary?

It is a ritual almost as clockwork as Jimmy The Groundhog or George W. Bush trying to de-fund PBS – questions as to whether PBS itself is still necessary…

HD-DVD: Hang The Crepe

I went to CES 2008 last month in part to get a sense of what was happening in the BluRay-vs-HD-DVD war. Of course, I wasn’t…

6 Million US Citizens With No TV. Is This A Big Thing?

According to a study cited in the Boston Globe, around six million Americans stand to lose all access to television next February. These people are what I like to call…