Allan Tépper – ProVideo Coalition https://www.provideocoalition.com A Moviola Company Mon, 29 May 2017 17:50:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.5 https://cdn.provideocoalition.com/app/uploads/cropped-Moviola-Favicon-2016-32x32.png Allan Tépper – ProVideo Coalition https://www.provideocoalition.com 32 32 Auphonic iOS Recorder 1.2 is a quantum leap improvement https://www.provideocoalition.com/auphonic-ios-recorder-12-is-a-quantum-leap-improvement/ https://www.provideocoalition.com/auphonic-ios-recorder-12-is-a-quantum-leap-improvement/#comments Thu, 25 May 2017 11:25:58 +0000 https://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=53664 In July 2016, I wrote a detailed article, where I made a complete list of wonderful features of the Android version of Auphonic Recorder, the then many missing features in the iOS version, and the very few missing ones in the Android one. Now, version 1.2 for iOS has addressed all of the issues and

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In July 2016, I wrote a detailed article, where I made a complete list of wonderful features of the Android version of Auphonic Recorder, the then many missing features in the iOS version, and the very few missing ones in the Android one. Now, version 1.2 for iOS has addressed all of the issues and has become even stronger than the Android version (except for editing). In fact, in some situations, Auphonic iOS Recorder 1.2 (which works with iPhone/iPad/iPod Touch) is now often better for the RØDE i-XLR device (which I recently reviewed) than the current native version of the RØDE Reporter app. Ahead I’ll cover all of the improvements, why the iOS version now beats the Android version, and when it even beats the RØDE Reporter app for the i-XLR device.

In this article

  • Link to July 2016 article
  • Missing features now added to Auphonic iOS Recorder 1.2
  • How the iOS version now beats the Android version
  • When Auphonic iOS Recorder 1.2 can often beat the RØDE Reporter app for i-XLR

Link to July 2016 article

Here is a link to my July 2016 comparative article Auphonic audio recording app for Android & iOS: strong mixed emotions.

Missing features now added to Auphonic iOS Recorder 1.2

Here are the missing features which have now appeared in the free Auphonic iOS Recorder 1.2:

  • The option to record at 48 kHz (the absolute standard for audio for video as covered in past articles, including All audio production & distribution should go 48 kHz.
  • The option to record at 24-bit resolution (see this article to understand the benefits of recording 24-bit even when you may not deliver in 24-bit)
  • The capability of recording mono when desired, to save space and bandwidth, even if the final production will be stereo
  • The stress-relieving recording display which now indicates the recording format, remaining space in time, sampling frequency (i.e. 48 kHz) and resolution (i.e. 24-bit)
  • Live monitoring (for use when the connected hardware doesn’t offer it)

How the iOS version now beats the Android version

The iOS version of Auphonic Recorder is now not only capable of recording 48 kHz sampling frequency and 24-bit resolution, it also automatically negotiates that sampling frequency with the connected hardware (i.e. digital microphone or standalone A-to-D converter) whenever the hardware offers it, as some other iOS apps do. This means that the audio recording will be native, not a resampled version. This is something that is not currently available with Auphonic Recorder for Android, since Auphonic Recorder for Android is currently incapable of negotiating with hardware the way USB Audio Recorder PRO for Android can. Currently, Auphonic Recorder for Android can either record at the device’s native sampling frequency —which is fortunately 48 kHz with my Google Pixel XL (Amazon link)— or resample if desired. However, Auphonic Recorder for Android cannot currently record 24-bit the way USB Audio Recorder PRO for Android can, or the way Auphonic iOS Recorder can starting with version 1.2.

In addition, the iOS version now includes software live monitoring, not currently available in the Android version.

When Auphonic iOS Recorder 1.2 can often beat the RØDE Reporter app for i-XLR

In case you missed it, here is my full review on RØDE’s i-XLR (Amazon linkB&H link). There I applauded nearly everything about the corresponding RØDE Reporter app except the notable lack of 48 kHZ 24 bit (currently, the RØDE Reporter app only offers 24 bit at 96 kHz) and the notable lack of a mono option. Here are my numeric justifications of recording 48 kHz 24 bit mono as opposed to 96 kHz 24-bit with fake stereo or 48 kHz 16 with fake stereo for a 1-hour recording:

  • 96 kHz/24-bit with fake stereo: 2073.6MB (2.0736 GB) (huge)
  • 48 kHz/16-bit with fake stereo: 691.2 MB (Wasted space for fake stereo, without the benefit of 24-bit resolution or audio bracketing.)

Now, here are the numbers for one hour of uncompressed WAVE recording, if RØDE accepts our request (or now, if we use Auphonic iOS Recorder 1.2 instead of the RØDE Reporter app):

  • 48 kHz/24-bit mono: 518.4 MB (All of the benefits of quality, headroom; the efficiency of a mono recording, with none of the compromises.)

(Number crunching thanks to ColinCrawley.com’s calculator.)

Of course, if you use Auphonic iOS Recorder 1.2 with i-XLR, you will be missing the hardware tally light and hardware Record/Pause button, which currently work exclusively with the RØDE Reporter app. So for now, it’s a tradeoff.

Conclusions and one more suggestion for Auphonic iOS Recorder

For all of the reasons mentioned above, Auphonic iOS Recorder 1.2 has become my recommended app for iOS when you need to record either mono or stereo at 48 kHz/24-bit for later editing elsewhere, be it audio-only or audio with video. On the iOS platform, at this point, I would only consider using another audio app if I needed to record multitrack beyond two channels, i.e. more than stereo. The only other two features I would like to see added would be:

  1. Two channel polyphonic (two separate files), for when recording an interview with two mono microphones connected to an interface. This would eliminate a step later, especially when uploading files to take advantage of Auphonic’s wonderful multitrack service with crossgating, to eliminate undesired crosstalk. As is, the “stereo” file would need to be separated into separate mono files using a different app before uploading.
  2. Translate/localize the strings of Auphonic iOS Recorder 1.2’s interface to Castilian, the most widely used Spanish language, but certainly not the only one.

Upcoming articles, reviews, radio shows, books and seminars/webinars

Stand by for upcoming articles, reviews, and books. Sign up to my free mailing list by clicking here. Most of my current books are at books.AllanTepper.com, and my personal website is AllanTepper.com.

Si deseas suscribirte a mi lista en castellano, visita aquí. Si prefieres, puedes suscribirte a ambas listas (castellano e inglés).


Listen to his CapicúaFM show at CapicúaFM.com in iTunes or Stitcher.

FTC disclosure

No manufacturer is specifically paying Allan Tépper or TecnoTur LLC to write this article or the mentioned books. Some of the other manufacturers listed above have contracted Tépper and/or TecnoTur LLC to carry out consulting and/or translations/localizations/transcreations. Many of the manufacturers listed above have sent Allan Tépper review units. So far, none of the manufacturers listed above is/are sponsors of the TecnoTur programs, although they are welcome to do so, and some are, may be (or may have been) sponsors of ProVideo Coalition magazine. Some links to third parties listed in this article and/or on this web page may indirectly benefit TecnoTur LLC via affiliate programs. Allan Tépper’s opinions are his own.

Copyright and use of this article

The articles contained in the TecnoTur channel in ProVideo Coalition magazine are copyright Allan Tépper/TecnoTur LLC, except where otherwise attributed. Unauthorized use is prohibited without prior approval, except for short quotes which link back to this page, which are encouraged!

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Rover: a higher priced iOgrapher/Padcaster type device https://www.provideocoalition.com/rover-a-higher-priced-iographerpadcaster-type-device/ https://www.provideocoalition.com/rover-a-higher-priced-iographerpadcaster-type-device/#respond Fri, 12 May 2017 20:48:23 +0000 https://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=52810 As a tech journalist who has previously reviewed both the iOgrapher and the Padcaster, I couldn’t resist doing the same with the new Rover when it was offered. Rover from Mathews is a similar yet higher priced device which reminds me of Zacuto. To test the Rover, I did my first-ever walking standups with Memo

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As a tech journalist who has previously reviewed both the iOgrapher and the Padcaster, I couldn’t resist doing the same with the new Rover when it was offered. Rover from Mathews is a similar yet higher priced device which reminds me of Zacuto. To test the Rover, I did my first-ever walking standups with Memo Sauceda and his iPhone 7 Plus. I used dual-system audio with three different body-mounted microphones: the RØDE HS2 headset microphone, the iRig Mic Lav from IK Multimedia and the MXL MM-160. There are short four videos ahead, one from the manufacturer, and three others.

How I discovered the Rover

The above video was supplied by the manufacturer

I first discovered the Rover when Filmtools offered to lend me one for review. For those unaware, Filmtools is a company which belongs to Moviola, which has been the parent company of ProVideo Coalition magazine (the one you are reading right now) since the beginning of 2016.

About the Rover

Both the respective manufacturers of the iOgrapher and the Padcaster describe this category of product as a “case”. Although I certainly like the products from both companies, I never really loved the term “case” to describe them, although I never came up with a better term either. Mathews Studio Equipment (the creator of Rover) calls it a “professional smartphone camera cage”. It is very high-end looking and lightweight, as well as very modular.

Cold shoes

I applaud iOgrapher, MXL, the Padcaster and Mathews Studio Equipment for using the proper term (cold shoe). It is a pet peeve of mine when some reviewers incorrectly describe a cold shoe a hot shoe. It should only be called a hot shoe if it has electrical contacts to accomplish a particular purpose, i.e. audio connection, flash sync or power.

For comparison purposes:

  • the iOgrapher for iPhone 6Plus/6s Plus contains two cold shoes.
  • The Padcaster for iPad Mini 4 includes one cold shoe, but you can add more for US$29.99 each. The Padcaster’s slogan when offering an extra cold shoe is: “Grab a cold one!”
  • The Rover comes with one cold shoe, although you can add more as part of the US$150 accessory kit, although it may be available separately.

Variable or fixed size for camera device?

  • Most iOgrapher “cases” are molded to match the corresponding devices to the near millimeter. However, the company also offers the iOgrapher Go for GoPro/Android/iPhone, with variable size. It includes a cold shoe.
  • Most Padcaster “cases” are molded to match the corresponding devices to the near millimeter. However, the company also offers the Padcaster Cage System which fits: “GoPro, DSLR or just about any small to mid-size camera out there” which includes three cold shoe adapters.
  • The Rover has variable size to cover devices up to 15.62cm x 8.25cm x .76cm (6.15” x 3.25“ x .3”). Among the tested devices listed are the iPhone 5/5c/5s/6/6s/6 Plus/6s Plus/SE, 7/7 Plus. Google Pixel/Pixel XL/Samsung Galaxy S5/S6/S6/EDGE+/NOTE 5/HTC One/Nexus 5.

Photos I shot of the Rover

I shot the following photos of Memo Sauceda as he used the Rover, using my Google Pixel XL (Amazon link) using the native Google camera app.

Three videos shot by Memo Sauceda

Memo Sauceda put his iPhone 7 Plus (Amazon link) into airplane mode and mounted it into the Rover. Likewise, I put my Google Pixel XL (Amazon link) into airplane mode. Memo shot the video with the scratch audio (for later auto synchronization in Final Cut Pro X) at 1080p ±30 fps for later conforming to 29.97p (and yes, that’s a rounded number too). (As explained in prior articles, video recording on iOS is with variable framerate, only with a target. Final Cut Pro X and Adobe Premiere CC are capable of reading this variable framerate and conforming it to the target framerate, which must be set manually when creating the project. Do not use the automatic option to set the project framerate).

In my Google Pixel XL, I recorded mono 48 kHz uncompressed WAV from each of the mentioned microphones.

Walking standup with Rover and RØDE HS2 head microphone

Above is the video with the Rover, iPhone 7 Plus, and RØDE HS2 head microphone (Amazon linkB&H link).

Walking standup with Rover and IK Multimedia iRig Mic Lav microphone

Above is the video with the Rover, iPhone 7 Plus, and IK Multimedia iRig Mic Lav microphone (Amazon linkB&H link).

Walking standup with Rover and MXL MM-160 lavalier microphone

Above is the video with the Rover, iPhone 7 Plus, and the MXL MM-160 lavalier microphone (Amazon linkB&H link).

Thanks to Memo Sauceda for the handheld videography. I normalized all video to -16 LUFS before importing it into Final Cut Pro X, synchronizing it with video, and then muting the scratch camera audio. I used no compression or equalization. Please comment about the audio quality comparison below.

Conclusions

From the lowest priced and lightweight iOgrapher line of products, to the mid-priced Padcaster line, to the highest-priced Rover, they all do the job: they hold the camera device and at least one cold shoe mounted device. Starting with the Padcaster line and up to the Rover, there is more modularity to add more cold shoes, and in the case of the Rover, more MICROgrip heads and rods. The Rover also has a level of sophistication that may allow you to bill a higher amount for your projects.

Visit the main website at mseRover.com.

Visit the two Rover products at FilmTools (who lent me the review unit) by clicking here.

Upcoming articles, reviews, radio shows, books and seminars/webinars

Stand by for upcoming articles, reviews, and books. Sign up to my free mailing list by clicking here. Most of my current books are at books.AllanTepper.com, and my personal website is AllanTepper.com.

Si deseas suscribirte a mi lista en castellano, visita aquí. Si prefieres, puedes suscribirte a ambas listas (castellano e inglés).


Listen to his CapicúaFM show at CapicúaFM.com in iTunes or Stitcher.

FTC disclosure

No manufacturer is specifically paying Allan Tépper or TecnoTur LLC to write this article or the mentioned books. Some of the other manufacturers listed above have contracted Tépper and/or TecnoTur LLC to carry out consulting and/or translations/localizations/transcreations. Many of the manufacturers listed above have sent Allan Tépper review units. So far, none of the manufacturers listed above is/are sponsors of the TecnoTur programs, although they are welcome to do so, and some are, may be (or may have been) sponsors of ProVideo Coalition magazine. Some links to third parties listed in this article and/or on this web page may indirectly benefit TecnoTur LLC via affiliate programs. Allan Tépper’s opinions are his own.

Copyright and use of this article

The articles contained in the TecnoTur channel in ProVideo Coalition magazine are copyright Allan Tépper/TecnoTur LLC, except where otherwise attributed. Unauthorized use is prohibited without prior approval, except for short quotes which link back to this page, which are encouraged!

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Streamstar to add NewTek NDI integration + JVC control https://www.provideocoalition.com/streamstar-to-add-newtek-ndi-integration-jvc-control/ https://www.provideocoalition.com/streamstar-to-add-newtek-ndi-integration-jvc-control/#respond Fri, 05 May 2017 22:09:37 +0000 https://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=52318 At NAB 2017, live production and streaming tools developer Streamstar from Bratislava, Slovakia announced that it will add NewTek’s NDI (Network Device Interface) to its complete product line. Streamstar also announced control of JVC camcorders and PTZ (pan/tilt/zoom) cameras. I have covered NDI in several prior articles and described it as the new lingua franca

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At NAB 2017, live production and streaming tools developer Streamstar from Bratislava, Slovakia announced that it will add NewTek’s NDI (Network Device Interface) to its complete product line. Streamstar also announced control of JVC camcorders and PTZ (pan/tilt/zoom) cameras. I have covered NDI in several prior articles and described it as the new lingua franca of broadcast manufacturers. Streamstar manufactures studio-in-a-box devices, many of which have a touch screen panel, which saves space and weight while streamlining the user interface.

As I have covered in several prior articles, NDI is an open standard created by NewTek that can be universally implemented so video equipment can be connected across a network enabling interconnected production workflows.  Streamstar is to support NDI inputs in its entire range of products.
“Streamstar, always on the cutting edge of advanced and emerging technologies, recognizes NDI as a way to future-proof production environments and an affordable gateway to IP video transfer. That’s why we decided to integrate it into all of our product lines,” says Michal Ivanic, CTO, Streamstar.

“Software-driven IP workflows are quickly becoming ubiquitous in video production,” said Michael Kornet, executive vice president of Business Development for NewTek. “NDI-enabled products like Streamstar’s SCOREPLUS exponentially increase the video sources available for live production creating efficiencies and opportunities for customers that did not previously exist. NDI is the most widely adopted IP technology on the market, epitomized by the millions of customers with access to it today.”
For information, Streamstar.com.

Upcoming articles, reviews, radio shows, books and seminars/webinars

Stand by for upcoming articles, reviews, and books. Sign up to my free mailing list by clicking here. Most of my current books are at books.AllanTepper.com, and my personal website is AllanTepper.com.

Si deseas suscribirte a mi lista en castellano, visita aquí. Si prefieres, puedes suscribirte a ambas listas (castellano e inglés).


Listen to his CapicúaFM show at CapicúaFM.com in iTunes or Stitcher.

FTC disclosure

No manufacturer is specifically paying Allan Tépper or TecnoTur LLC to write this article or the mentioned books. Some of the other manufacturers listed above have contracted Tépper and/or TecnoTur LLC to carry out consulting and/or translations/localizations/transcreations. Many of the manufacturers listed above have sent Allan Tépper review units. So far, none of the manufacturers listed above is/are sponsors of the TecnoTur programs, although they are welcome to do so, and some are, may be (or may have been) sponsors of ProVideo Coalition magazine. Some links to third parties listed in this article and/or on this web page may indirectly benefit TecnoTur LLC via affiliate programs. Allan Tépper’s opinions are his own.

Copyright and use of this article

The articles contained in the TecnoTur channel in ProVideo Coalition magazine are copyright Allan Tépper/TecnoTur LLC, except where otherwise attributed. Unauthorized use is prohibited without prior approval, except for short quotes which link back to this page, which are encouraged!

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Blackmagic responds: Yes to Castilian & Mandarin; no to PsF removal https://www.provideocoalition.com/blackmagic-responds-yes-to-castilian-mandarin-no-to-psf-removal/ https://www.provideocoalition.com/blackmagic-responds-yes-to-castilian-mandarin-no-to-psf-removal/#respond Tue, 02 May 2017 18:28:03 +0000 https://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=52158 After its obscure press release at NAB last week, Blackmagic has now clarified that its Video Assist’s new updated firmware indeed includes Castilian & Mandarin (among 9 other languages), but does not currently include Cantonese, Catalán, Basque, Galician, PsF removal or reverse telecine. Blackmagic says that it will be adding more languages later. What does

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After its obscure press release at NAB last week, Blackmagic has now clarified that its Video Assist’s new updated firmware indeed includes Castilian & Mandarin (among 9 other languages), but does not currently include Cantonese, Catalán, Basque, Galician, PsF removal or reverse telecine. Blackmagic says that it will be adding more languages later. What does this situation mean to you? The first issue obviously depends upon your language needs or preferences. The second pair of issues depends upon whether your camera can output native pure progressive over HDMI or SDI at your desired framerate —or if not, whether you are willing and able to compensate for the pseudo-interlaced recording in post, via a workaround, or perhaps choose a competitive device from Átomos or Video Devices which can take care of this issue before recording. Ahead I’ll go into detail about all of that, and give you examples.

Languages

Even though Blackmagic was obscure about the languages included in its initial press release about its new firmware for Video Assist, it is now clear that the languages are:

  • Castilian (the most widely used Spanish language worldwide, but certainly not the only one)
  • English
  • French
  • German
  • Italian
  • Japanese
  • Korean
  • Mandarin (the most important Chinese language, but certainly not the only one)
  • Portuguese
  • Russian
  • Turkish

Blackmagic also indicated that it would be adding even more languages, but didn’t indicate which ones or when.

No PsF removal or reverse telecine in Video Assist

Even though back in 2015, Blackmagic was looking into this issue, the company is apparently no longer doing so, since it confirmed no such capability of PsF removal or reverse telecine in Video Assist.

For those we are new to this topic or require a refresher, here is an executive summary:

Almost all standard definition video is/was interlaced, where each video frame is/was divided into fields (which have half of the spatial resolution of a frame). Interlaced video complicates things, considering that some interlaced video formats have a different dominant field. In addition, interlacing adds artifacts and makes compression more complex. On the other hand, all 4K (both Cinema 4K and 4K UHD) and some HD formats are truly progressive, meaning that they consist only of true frames, without fields. However, while some HD video is truly progressive; some HD video is authentically interlaced; and some is HD video progressive disguised as interlaced video. Most HD cameras and camcorders which are capable of imaging and even recording true progressive internally, are sadly incapable of delivering true progressive via their HDMI or SDI port, while others are capable of delivering true progressive video via HDMI or SDI port at some framerates, but not at others… and some can’t output pure progressive at all, even though they can record it internally. In those cases, those cameras deliver the progressive video via the HDMI or SDI port disguised as interlaced video in either two different ways, depending upon the original framerate, as indicated below:

  • 23.976p (aka “23.98”) via a telecine pulldown at 59.94i, using a 2:3 (aka 3:2) pulldown
  • 25p via PsF as 50i using a 2:2 pulldown
  • 29.97p via PsF as 59.94i using a 2:2 pulldown

As I have covered in several past articles, manufacturers like Átomos, NewTek and Video Devices (a brand of Sound Devices) have recognized this issue and have all added the function to reverse this undesired phenomenon caused sadly by many camera manufacturers. All three mentioned companies do this the correct way, without de-interlacing, since de-interlacing a disguised progressive signal degrades it unnecessarily. In most cases, it is necessary to indicate to the device —manually— that the particular source is PsF or telecine.

To be clear, the absolute best scenario is have the camera output pure progressive directly via HDMI or SDI. The second best way is to have the device (i.e. from Átomos, NewTek or Video Devices) properly perform reverse telecine or convert PsF into progressive before recording. The third and last solution is to follow the instructions in my PsF missing workflow series, which up until now include 10 parts.

If you are going to record 4K UHD

If you are recording 4K UHD using the new Video Assist 4K model, you have nothing to worry, since 4K over HDMI is always progressive, so there is no issue to record progressive in this case. (The Video Assist 4K only offers 4K UHD, and does not offer Cinema 4K.)

If you are going to record 720p

If you are going to record 720p59.94 or 720p50, there is no problem with either Video Assist.

If you desire to record 1080p

If you are lucky enough to have one of the few cameras that can deliver pure progressive over HDMI at your desired framerate, then you may certainly consider a Video Assist from Blackmagic. However, if your camera is incapable of outputting pure progressive at your desired framerate, you might consider purchasing one of the similar products from Átomos or Video Devices (a brand of Sound Devices) to avoid the hassle and/or possible human error of the workarounds in post. I am truly surprised that Blackmagic has chosen to ignore this known issue and feature, while its primary competition has addressed and solved it.

Upcoming articles, reviews, radio shows, books and seminars/webinars

Stand by for upcoming articles, reviews, and books. Sign up to my free mailing list by clicking here. Most of my current books are at books.AllanTepper.com, and my personal website is AllanTepper.com.

Si deseas suscribirte a mi lista en castellano, visita aquí. Si prefieres, puedes suscribirte a ambas listas (castellano e inglés).


Listen to his CapicúaFM show at CapicúaFM.com in iTunes or Stitcher.

FTC disclosure

No manufacturer is specifically paying Allan Tépper or TecnoTur LLC to write this article or the mentioned books. Some of the other manufacturers listed above have contracted Tépper and/or TecnoTur LLC to carry out consulting and/or translations/localizations/transcreations. Many of the manufacturers listed above have sent Allan Tépper review units. So far, none of the manufacturers listed above is/are sponsors of the TecnoTur programs, although they are welcome to do so, and some are, may be (or may have been) sponsors of ProVideo Coalition magazine. Some links to third parties listed in this article and/or on this web page may indirectly benefit TecnoTur LLC via affiliate programs. Allan Tépper’s opinions are his own.

Copyright and use of this article

The articles contained in the TecnoTur channel in ProVideo Coalition magazine are copyright Allan Tépper/TecnoTur LLC, except where otherwise attributed. Unauthorized use is prohibited without prior approval, except for short quotes which link back to this page, which are encouraged!

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JVC GY-LS300 adds 4:2:2 internal 4K recording https://www.provideocoalition.com/jvc-gy-ls300-adds-422-internal-4k-recording/ https://www.provideocoalition.com/jvc-gy-ls300-adds-422-internal-4k-recording/#respond Wed, 26 Apr 2017 14:48:22 +0000 https://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=51473 At NAB 2017, JVC Professional Video just announced the free version 4.0 firmware upgrade for its GY-LS300CH 4KCAM Super 35mm handheld camcorder. This update increases color resolution to 4:2:2 in 4K mode recording and expands 4K Ultra HD (3840×2160) output to include 59.94p and 50p. JVC is demonstrating the new capabilities at its booth C4315,

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At NAB 2017, JVC Professional Video just announced the free version 4.0 firmware upgrade for its GY-LS300CH 4KCAM Super 35mm handheld camcorder. This update increases color resolution to 4:2:2 in 4K mode recording and expands 4K Ultra HD (3840×2160) output to include 59.94p and 50p. JVC is demonstrating the new capabilities at its booth C4315, from April 24-27 in Las Vegas, Nevada, United States. There are many technical details related to this upgrade that I’ll cover ahead.

As I have covered in past articles, despite some innocent misinformation published on some dealer websites, the GY-LS300 (Amazon linkB&H link) as well as its lower cost sisters with smaller sensors, the GY-HM200 (Amazon linkB&H link) and GY-HM170 (Amazon linkB&H link) are all fortunately worldcam models in all modes except for SD (standard definition). All HD and 4K modes in all of these cameras are fortunately worldcam, even when sold in the United States.

The free firmware version 4.0 for the GY-LS300 provides 4:2:2 (8-bit) 4K recording at 23.976/exact 24/25/29.97p onboard to SDXC media cards. (As of press time of this article, it is clear that the GY-LS300 offers exact 24 fps in Cinema 4K and Cinema 2K, but possibly not in 4K UHD or in HD modes. This makes sense, since exact 24 is mostly for filmout and DCI.) In addition, IP remote function will now allow remote control and image viewing in 4K. When using 4K 4:2:2 recording mode, the video output from the HDMI/SDI terminals is scaled down to HD. The version 4.0 firmware upgrade is free of charge for all current GY-LS300CH owners and will be available in late May according to JVC. For internal recording, the decision to record your 4K at 4:2:2 or 4:2:0 will depend how you want to manage your maximum bit budget of 150 megabits per second when recording at 4K, as I have also covered in past articles.

After the new 4.0 firmware update, the GY-LS300CH will also now have the capability to output 4K Ultra HD at 59.94p/50p via its HDMI 2.0b port. Through JVC’s partnership with Átomos, the GY-LS300CH will operate seamlessly with the new Ninja Inferno and Shogun Inferno monitor recorders, triggering recording from the camera’s start/stop operation. Plus, when the camera is set to J-Log1 gamma recording mode, the Atomos units will record the HDR footage and display it on their integrated, seven-inch monitors.

“The upgrades included in our Version 4.0 firmware provide performance enhancements for high raster recording and IP remote capability in 4K, adding even more content creation flexibility to the GY-LS300CH,” said Craig Yanagi, product marketing manager, JVCKENWOOD. “Seamless integration with the new Ninja Inferno will help deliver 60p to our customers and allow them to produce outstanding footage for a variety of 4K and UHD productions.”

Designed for cinematographers, documentarians, and broadcast production departments, the GY-LS300CH features JVC’s 4K Super 35 CMOS sensor and an industry standard Micro Four Thirds (MFT) lens mount. With its unique Variable Scan Mapping technology, the GY-LS300CH adjusts the sensor to provide native support of MFT, PL, EF, and other lenses, which connect to the camera via third-party adapters. Other features include Prime Zoom, which allows shooters using fixed-focal (prime) lenses to zoom in and out without loss of resolution or depth, and a built-in HD streaming engine with Wi-Fi and 4G LTE connectivity for live HD transmission directly to hardware decoders as well as JVCVIDEOCLOUD, Facebook Live, and other CDNs (content distribution networks).

As of press time of this article, it was not yet clear whether 4K 4:2:2 will be able to be recorded externally. I’ll update that detail when I receive the response from JVC, or publish a new article.

Upcoming articles, reviews, radio shows, books and seminars/webinars

Stand by for upcoming articles, reviews, and books. Sign up to my free mailing list by clicking here. Most of my current books are at books.AllanTepper.com, and my personal website is AllanTepper.com.

Si deseas suscribirte a mi lista en castellano, visita aquí. Si prefieres, puedes suscribirte a ambas listas (castellano e inglés).


Listen to his CapicúaFM show at CapicúaFM.com in iTunes or Stitcher.

FTC disclosure

No manufacturer is specifically paying Allan Tépper or TecnoTur LLC to write this article or the mentioned books. Some of the other manufacturers listed above have contracted Tépper and/or TecnoTur LLC to carry out consulting and/or translations/localizations/transcreations. Many of the manufacturers listed above have sent Allan Tépper review units. So far, none of the manufacturers listed above is/are sponsors of the TecnoTur programs, although they are welcome to do so, and some are, may be (or may have been) sponsors of ProVideo Coalition magazine. Some links to third parties listed in this article and/or on this web page may indirectly benefit TecnoTur LLC via affiliate programs. Allan Tépper’s opinions are his own.

Copyright and use of this article

The articles contained in the TecnoTur channel in ProVideo Coalition magazine are copyright Allan Tépper/TecnoTur LLC, except where otherwise attributed. Unauthorized use is prohibited without prior approval, except for short quotes which link back to this page, which are encouraged!

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Blackmagic adds scopes and multilingual support to Video Assist https://www.provideocoalition.com/blackmagic-adds-scopes-and-multilingual-support-to-video-assist/ https://www.provideocoalition.com/blackmagic-adds-scopes-and-multilingual-support-to-video-assist/#respond Tue, 25 Apr 2017 17:54:14 +0000 https://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=51375 If you don’t recall, back in 2015, Blackmagic announced its Video Assist, a monitor/recorder. At NAB 2017, Blackmagic announced its firmware updates for its Video Assist to add multilingual support for 10 languages and new scopes, including waveform, RGB parade, vectorscope and histogram which can be viewed full screen. The exact 10 languages are listed

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If you don’t recall, back in 2015, Blackmagic announced its Video Assist, a monitor/recorder. At NAB 2017, Blackmagic announced its firmware updates for its Video Assist to add multilingual support for 10 languages and new scopes, including waveform, RGB parade, vectorscope and histogram which can be viewed full screen. The exact 10 languages are listed by Blackmagic, but yet unclear, as you’ll see ahead, together with the yet undetermined PsF and reverse telecine capability.

What languages?

The Blackmagic press release lists the following, with my comment just after in parenthesis:

I wrote those comments in parenthesis since there are several Chinese and at least four Spanish languages recognized in Part 3 of the Spanish Constitution of 1978, including Castilian, Catalán, Basque (Euskera with multiple accepted spellings) and Galician. Since I have published several books about this topic, I am quite anxious to get a clarification from Blackmagic. When Blackmagic responds, I’ll update this article.

The new scopes make the Blackmagic Video Assist 4K model perfect for live production monitoring, as a portable test scope for broadcasters, and even for balancing color when color grading using the RGB parade scope.

Pending question regarding removal of pulldown from PsF and telecine over HDMI

Back in 2015, when Blackmagic first released the Video Assist, I asked whether it could remove pulldown from PsF and telecine over HDMI (29.97p-over–59.94i, 25p-over–50i, and 23.976p-over–59.94i) before recording. The answer then was: “No, but we are looking into it.” Back in 2015, nearly all HDMI cameras unfortunately output PsF and telecine exclusively. Although there are now some new HDMI cameras that can output pure progressive at certain framerates, there are still many more that can unfortunately still only output PsF and telecine. At least three other manufacturers offer solutions to remove pulldown and PsF in their products before recording, as I have covered in many past articles. I have reiterated my question to Blackmagic. When I receive the response, I’ll either update this article or publish another.

Availability and price

The Blackmagic Video Assist 2.4 update is available now from the Blackmagic Design website free of charge for all current Blackmagic Video Assist and Blackmagic Video Assist 4K customers. Blackmagic Video Assist 2.5, which will support scopes on the Blackmagic Video Assist 4K model should be available in June 2017.

Upcoming articles, reviews, radio shows, books and seminars/webinars

Stand by for upcoming articles, reviews, and books. Sign up to my free mailing list by clicking here. Most of my current books are at books.AllanTepper.com, and my personal website is AllanTepper.com.

Si deseas suscribirte a mi lista en castellano, visita aquí. Si prefieres, puedes suscribirte a ambas listas (castellano e inglés).


Listen to his CapicúaFM show at CapicúaFM.com in iTunes or Stitcher.

FTC disclosure

No manufacturer is specifically paying Allan Tépper or TecnoTur LLC to write this article or the mentioned books. Some of the other manufacturers listed above have contracted Tépper and/or TecnoTur LLC to carry out consulting and/or translations/localizations/transcreations. Many of the manufacturers listed above have sent Allan Tépper review units. So far, none of the manufacturers listed above is/are sponsors of the TecnoTur programs, although they are welcome to do so, and some are, may be (or may have been) sponsors of ProVideo Coalition magazine. Some links to third parties listed in this article and/or on this web page may indirectly benefit TecnoTur LLC via affiliate programs. Allan Tépper’s opinions are his own.

Copyright and use of this article

The articles contained in the TecnoTur channel in ProVideo Coalition magazine are copyright Allan Tépper/TecnoTur LLC, except where otherwise attributed. Unauthorized use is prohibited without prior approval, except for short quotes which link back to this page, which are encouraged!

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Sound Devices launches new audio recorders/mixers with USB audio streaming https://www.provideocoalition.com/sound-devices-launches-new-audio-recordersmixers-with-usb-audio-streaming/ https://www.provideocoalition.com/sound-devices-launches-new-audio-recordersmixers-with-usb-audio-streaming/#respond Mon, 24 Apr 2017 18:33:14 +0000 https://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=51191 At NAB 2017, Sound Devices has announced the new MixPre Series of audio mixer/recorders with integrated USB audio interface. The lightweight, high-resolution MixPre-3 & MixPre-6 audio mixers recorders with USB audio streaming offer hefty preamps combined with extreme durability. The new Kashmir microphone preamps have much more gain than competitive units, as I’ll cover ahead.

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At NAB 2017, Sound Devices has announced the new MixPre Series of audio mixer/recorders with integrated USB audio interface. The lightweight, high-resolution MixPre-3 & MixPre-6 audio mixers recorders with USB audio streaming offer hefty preamps combined with extreme durability.

The new Kashmir microphone preamps have much more gain than competitive units, as I’ll cover ahead. They also feature a published -130dBV noise floor, analog limiters, and new 32-bit A-to-D converters to ensure high quality, stress-free, professional-grade audio recordings. I hope to review one very soon. Ahead is more info and a video.

Competitive comparison of total available gain from XLR mic inputs:

  • New Sound Devices MixPre-6: +96 dB
  • New Sound Devices MixPre-3: +96 dB
  • Zoom H6: +55.5 dB
  • Zoom H5: +52 dB
  • Zoom H4n Pro: +43 dB

For dynamic mics, at least +60 dB is considered a bare minimum, and even more for an ElectroVoice RE20 or Shure SM7B to avoid having to max out the potentiometers, or avoid having to purchase a FetHead or CloudLifter for each source.

“Our new Sound Devices MixPre Series is the culmination of decades of experience designing products for the best-of-the-best in the professional audio industry,” says Matt Anderson, CEO of Sound Devices, LLC. “Our mic preamps simply have to be heard to be believed, whether mic’ing drums, birds, or dialog, using condenser, dynamic, or ribbon mics, the finest textures of the audio are preserved. The MixPre-3 and MixPre-6 merge the latest advances in audio technology with an unintimidating, compact and rugged design. These products are a must-have piece of equipment for anyone ranging from production engineers and musicians to YouTubers.”

The MixPre-3 features 3 full-sized balanced XLR mic/line audio inputs, while the MixPre-6 features 4 balanced XLR/TRS combo jacks to connect microphones or line-level devices. Both have a 3.5 mm auxiliary input that can be used for plug-in power mics, 2-channel line-in audio, camera return, or timecode.

The versatile MixPre-3 and MixPre-6 make excellent USB audio interfaces, offering the unique ability to record audio to an SD card while simultaneously streaming multiple channels of audio via USB. Handy for interviews, podcasts, or simply as a backup recorder to your computer, the MixPre’s can be used for Skype or FaceTime interviews, and to record audio for podcasts or video blogs. As a musician’s tool, the MixPre Series serves as a top-shelf USB interface with premium mic pres for use with a DAW, getting a quick song idea recorded without AC power handy, recording rehearsals or just adding a few more inputs to your PA system.

Some of the unique features of the MixPre Series include:

  • Ultra-compact & durable – the MixPre Series will fit any production environment. The MixPre’s small stature allows you to wear it, or drop it into your pocket or a tech bag. Constructed with a die-cast aluminum chassis, the MixPre Series is both lightweight and incredibly robust.
  • Responsive, capacitive touch screen – for incredibly simple and intuitive operation, and a bright, IPS technology, sunlight-readable color LCD for the ultimate in convenient navigation.
  • Full-featured mixer – equipped with ergonomic gain control knobs for fast and accurate mixing. Other key features include pan and soloing plus easy-to-see ring LED metering per channel. also includes a 3.5mm jack for headphone monitoring with user-programmable presets from our custom-designed powerful, wide-bandwidth headphone amp.
  • Built-in Bluetooth Smart technology – allows for easy connection, control and metering via iOS devices from the Sound Devices free Wingman app.
  • Intuitive operation – with user-friendly navigation featuring Basic and Advanced modes. Basic mode allows users to record noise and distortion-free audio right out of the box – intended for stereo recording applications. The Advanced mode offers more experienced audio users access to multi-channel recording and advanced settings such as ISO metering, routing, timecode, mic pre gain, stereo and Mid/Side channel linking, headphone presets and more.
  • Perfect camera companion – offering HDMI Record triggering, timecode, and retractable 1/4-inch-20-thread mounting screw.
  • Flexible powering – for the ultimate in portability and convenience, the MixPre’s can be powered from AA batteries, Li-Ion batteries, a laptop’s USB-C or USB-A connectors, or AC wall outlet.

The MixPre Series is available to order from any Sound Devices authorized reseller, and is anticipated to ship by May 5, 2017.

Upcoming articles, reviews, radio shows, books and seminars/webinars

Stand by for upcoming articles, reviews, and books. Sign up to my free mailing list by clicking here. Most of my current books are at books.AllanTepper.com, and my personal website is AllanTepper.com.

Si deseas suscribirte a mi lista en castellano, visita aquí. Si prefieres, puedes suscribirte a ambas listas (castellano e inglés).

Listen to his CapicúaFM show at CapicúaFM.com in iTunes or Stitcher.

FTC disclosure

No manufacturer is specifically paying Allan Tépper or TecnoTur LLC to write this article or the mentioned books. Some of the other manufacturers listed above have contracted Tépper and/or TecnoTur LLC to carry out consulting and/or translations/localizations/transcreations. Many of the manufacturers listed above have sent Allan Tépper review units. So far, none of the manufacturers listed above is/are sponsors of the TecnoTur programs, although they are welcome to do so, and some are, may be (or may have been) sponsors of ProVideo Coalition magazine. Some links to third parties listed in this article and/or on this web page may indirectly benefit TecnoTur LLC via affiliate programs. Allan Tépper’s opinions are his own.

Copyright and use of this article

The articles contained in the TecnoTur channel in ProVideo Coalition magazine are copyright Allan Tépper/TecnoTur LLC, except where otherwise attributed. Unauthorized use is prohibited without prior approval, except for short quotes which link back to this page, which are encouraged!

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MulticoreWare shows LipSync to autodetect a/v sync via deep learning + GPUs https://www.provideocoalition.com/multicoreware-shows-lipsync-to-autodetect-av-sync-via-deep-learning-gpus/ https://www.provideocoalition.com/multicoreware-shows-lipsync-to-autodetect-av-sync-via-deep-learning-gpus/#respond Mon, 24 Apr 2017 16:07:13 +0000 https://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=51170 MulticoreWare’s LipSync technology uses deep neural networks to autodetect audio/video sync errors by “watching” and “listening” to videos. According to MulticoreWare, NVIDIA GPU-accelerated models find and match instances of human faces and human speech in up to 2-3x realtime, enabling highly scalable quality control for file-based or streaming content. LipSync technology is being demonstrated at

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MulticoreWare’s LipSync technology uses deep neural networks to autodetect audio/video sync errors by “watching” and “listening” to videos. According to MulticoreWare, NVIDIA GPU-accelerated models find and match instances of human faces and human speech in up to 2-3x realtime, enabling highly scalable quality control for file-based or streaming content. LipSync technology is being demonstrated at NAB2017 by MulticoreWare, developers of the x265 HEVC video encoder.

Typical causes of audio-video misalignment include transmission and transcode errors, incorrect video cuts, or incorrect framerate conversions. With an ever-increasing amount of video content, sources, transmissions, and transcodes, sync errors can occur more frequently. MulticoreWare developed LipSync to automatically detect synchronization errors to ensure content integrity at scales where manual verification is intractable or expensive.

According to its creator, LipSync combines the latest deep learning neural network techniques with statistical analysis to test videos without relying on digital fingerprinting or watermarking. Audio/video synchronization detection is performed by analyzing moving lips and faces and listening for human speech patterns, similar to how a human viewer would watch a video. Unlike a human viewer, LipSync can process file-based content at 2-3x real-time or analyze multiple video streams in real-time using NVIDIA GPU-accelerated servers.

“We are the first-to-market with a machine learning-based solution,” says Arun Ramanathan, VP and GM for Machine Learning at MulticoreWare. “This was made possible by combining our expertise in video processing, GPU computing and deep learning.”

NVIDIA GPUs enabled the development of LipSync into a realtime solution. “LipSync is an impressive example of how deep learning, accelerated by NVIDIA GPUs, solves major challenges in creating and distributing video content,” said Will Ramey, director of Developer Marketing at NVIDIA. “This innovative application addresses a pervasive problem for the entire industry.”

Telestream and MulticoreWare are partnering to make LipSync available to enterprise customers. Shawn Carnahan, CTO of Telestream said that, “Identifying audio-video sync errors has long been a challenge in our industry and Telestream is excited to offer an automated solution using deep learning technologies. Telestream is working closely with MulticoreWare to integrate LipSync into our products.”

Telestream recently expanded its video quality-control portfolio with the acquisition of VidCheck and IneoQuest.

MulticoreWare is currently demonstrating LipSync technology for new partners and licensees. Video quality control providers, broadcasters, and content distributors can integrate LipSync into their existing software or pipelines, or use it as a standalone product on-site or in the cloud. On-demand usage is supported on Amazon Web Services (AWS), Google Cloud Platform, and other GPU-accelerated cloud services running Windows or Linux. Licensing models include perpetual on-premise installations, integration licenses, and per-usage pricing.

For more information visit lipsync.multicorewareinc.com or MulticoreWare’s booth SU14002 at NAB 2017.

Upcoming articles, reviews, radio shows, books and seminars/webinars

Stand by for upcoming articles, reviews, and books. Sign up to my free mailing list by clicking here. Most of my current books are at books.AllanTepper.com, and my personal website is AllanTepper.com.

Si deseas suscribirte a mi lista en castellano, visita aquí. Si prefieres, puedes suscribirte a ambas listas (castellano e inglés).


Listen to his CapicúaFM show at CapicúaFM.com in iTunes or Stitcher.

FTC disclosure

No manufacturer is specifically paying Allan Tépper or TecnoTur LLC to write this article or the mentioned books. Some of the other manufacturers listed above have contracted Tépper and/or TecnoTur LLC to carry out consulting and/or translations/localizations/transcreations. Many of the manufacturers listed above have sent Allan Tépper review units. So far, none of the manufacturers listed above is/are sponsors of the TecnoTur programs, although they are welcome to do so, and some are, may be (or may have been) sponsors of ProVideo Coalition magazine. Some links to third parties listed in this article and/or on this web page may indirectly benefit TecnoTur LLC via affiliate programs. Allan Tépper’s opinions are his own.

Copyright and use of this article

The articles contained in the TecnoTur channel in ProVideo Coalition magazine are copyright Allan Tépper/TecnoTur LLC, except where otherwise attributed. Unauthorized use is prohibited without prior approval, except for short quotes which link back to this page, which are encouraged!

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HP adds 31-inch 4K DreamColor and improves 24-inch “little brother” https://www.provideocoalition.com/hp-adds-31-inch-4k-dreamcolor-and-improves-24-inch-little-brother/ https://www.provideocoalition.com/hp-adds-31-inch-4k-dreamcolor-and-improves-24-inch-little-brother/#respond Mon, 24 Apr 2017 08:01:00 +0000 https://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=51065 At NAB, HP has announced its new DreamColor Z31x with native 4K cinema resolution and some very welcome new features, and has also released a somewhat improved “little brother”, the Z24x G2 (second generation), which remains much more affordable, yet much more limited. Although I haven’t seen them personally yet, I was able to ask

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At NAB, HP has announced its new DreamColor Z31x with native 4K cinema resolution and some very welcome new features, and has also released a somewhat improved “little brother”, the Z24x G2 (second generation), which remains much more affordable, yet much more limited. Although I haven’t seen them personally yet, I was able to ask very specific questions during the online presentation last week, which I’ll cover ahead, together with the official specs, prices, availability, and my still-required rant about non-integer framerates and integer pricing. I hope to publish a full review of the Z31x later this year, with a more detailed article about the Z24x.

DreamColor Z31x

The DreamColor Z31x offers native 4K cinema resolution (4096×2160 with 1.9:1 aspect ratio) while also being able to display smaller 16:9 and 4:3 resolutions like 4K UHD 3840×2160; 2048×2160; 2560×1440; 2048×1080; 1920×1080; 1366×768; 1280×1024; 1280×720; 1024×768; 800×600; 720×400; 640×480.

Keeping tradition, the DreamColor Z31 offers a true 10-bit panel, and also offers 100% of sRGB, 100% of BT.709, 100% of AdobeRGB, 99% of DCI-P3, 80% of BT.2020.

HP confirmed to me that (like prior DreamColor displays), the DreamColor Z31x can properly lock to integer and non-integer framerates including:

  • 23.976 (further rounded to 23.98 by some)
  • 24 exact
  • 25
  • 29.97 (yes, it’s a rounded number too)
  • 47.952
  • 48 exact
  • 50
  • 59.94 (yes, it’s a rounded number too)

However, I pushed to get more information, since proper locking isn’t enough. I wanted to know whether the Z31x would also properly display the incoming framerate on its OSD (onscreen display), since prior DreamColor models have not done it correctly at all framerates, as I have reported to HP. For example, the original LP2480zx rounds all non-integer framerates to the closest integer on the OSD, and the more recent Z27x (Amazon link, B&H link) is inconsistent, properly reporting some non-integer framerates, but not others. HP promises that this has been handled perfectly with the new Z31x. I’ll confirm that when I publish my review.

The Z31x inputs include two DisplayPort 1.2 connectors, two HDMI 2.0 and one USB Type-C (DisplayPort Alt Mode).

Unlike any DreamColor before, the Z31x features a built-in colorimeter, as well as an integrated KVM switch, preset and customizable on-screen markers, user presets, remote management, customizable on-screen controls, “Real” IPS, and is fortunately still matte (aka “anti-glare”)!

Z24x G2

Some people call it the DreamColor’s “little brother”. Others call it a “junior” DreamColor. At well under US$600, the Z24x G2 (second generation) is much more affordable than the original sticker price of the first LP2480zx DreamColor, the still current Z27x… or the just announced Z31x.

Fortunately, the Z24x G2 has improvements over the first generation Z24x, especially since the first generation Z24x only offered calibration software for Windows, not Mac. The new Z24x G2 fortunately offers calibration software for both Mac and Windows. However, the Z24x G2 is much more limited —for pro video applications— than the higher priced DreamColor models regarding native framerates. HP responded that the Z24x G2 is 60 Hz ±0.5%. By my math, 60 – 0.5% = 59.7 which means that it barely covers 59.94, so if you want to watch the native cadence, it’s really only appropriate for 29.97 and 59.94 timelines/projects. Forget about native cadence monitoring of 25 and 50 fps timelines/projects, and if you edit video with a 23.976 or exact 24 timeline, you’ll have to view it with a 2:3 (aka 3:2) pulldown. Of course, those framerate limitations are irrelevant for pre-press applications.

At publication time of this article, HP had not yet responded as to whether the HP calibration software for the Z24x G2 actually stores the created profile in the monitor (which is critical if you are going to connect it via a professional video interface) as higher-end DreamColor monitors do, or whether they are stored in the host computer (okay for direct-to-computer connection only, with its associated framerate issues. This is especially relevant on Mac, where the computer won’t even deliver any non-integer framerates directly, as covered in past articles). I will publish more information on the Z24x G2 as I receive it, together with a detailed and practical comparison chart between the Z24x, a ±US$300 consumer multi-standard 1080p HDTV set with “true 24p” (as covered in this article) and the higher end DreamColor monitors. Be sure to be on my mailing list to assure receiving that and other future articles.

Price and availability

HP says that the DreamColor Z31x is scheduled to be available later this year (2017) for $3999, and that the DreamColor Z24x G2 Display is scheduled to be available in early July 2017 for US$559.

My comment/rant about rounding framerates versus prices

In my humble opinion, all manufacturers should state non-integer framerates to two decimals (i.e. 29.97 and 59.94) in spec sheets and OSDs (onscreen displays) for best understanding and usage by the production community. Whenever possible, they should also state 23.976 to three decimals, and only if constrained in space should they state it as 23.98. However, professional products’ list prices should be proudly and officially set at the closest round number, i.e. US$560 and US$4000.

Upcoming articles, reviews, radio shows, books and seminars/webinars

Stand by for upcoming articles, reviews, and books. Sign up to my free mailing list by clicking here. Most of my current books are at books.AllanTepper.com, and my personal website is AllanTepper.com.

Si deseas suscribirte a mi lista en castellano, visita aquí. Si prefieres, puedes suscribirte a ambas listas (castellano e inglés).


Listen to his CapicúaFM show at CapicúaFM.com in iTunes or Stitcher.

FTC disclosure

No manufacturer is specifically paying Allan Tépper or TecnoTur LLC to write this article or the mentioned books. Some of the other manufacturers listed above have contracted Tépper and/or TecnoTur LLC to carry out consulting and/or translations/localizations/transcreations. Many of the manufacturers listed above have sent Allan Tépper review units. So far, none of the manufacturers listed above is/are sponsors of the TecnoTur programs, although they are welcome to do so, and some are, may be (or may have been) sponsors of ProVideo Coalition magazine. Some links to third parties listed in this article and/or on this web page may indirectly benefit TecnoTur LLC via affiliate programs. Allan Tépper’s opinions are his own.

Copyright and use of this article

The articles contained in the TecnoTur channel in ProVideo Coalition magazine are copyright Allan Tépper/TecnoTur LLC, except where otherwise attributed. Unauthorized use is prohibited without prior approval, except for short quotes which link back to this page, which are encouraged!

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Panasonic DMW-XLR1 XLR interface for GH5 quality revealed by Curtis Judd https://www.provideocoalition.com/panasonic-dmw-xlr1-xlr-interface-for-gh5-quality-revealed-by-curtis-judd/ https://www.provideocoalition.com/panasonic-dmw-xlr1-xlr-interface-for-gh5-quality-revealed-by-curtis-judd/#comments Sun, 23 Apr 2017 19:43:17 +0000 https://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=51057 Back in January 2017, I first wrote about Panasonic’s new GH5 and its DMW-XLR1 XLR audio interface (link ahead). At that time, I covered the DMW-XLR1’s specs and features, many of which were still quite obscure: Panasonic neglected to publish the total available gain, which is especially important with dynamic microphones. Despite no response so

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Back in January 2017, I first wrote about Panasonic’s new GH5 and its DMW-XLR1 XLR audio interface (link ahead). At that time, I covered the DMW-XLR1’s specs and features, many of which were still quite obscure: Panasonic neglected to publish the total available gain, which is especially important with dynamic microphones. Despite no response so far from Panasonic to my inquiry, fortunately Curtis Judd has now done a thorough test and video review. Ahead you’ll see and hear his video review, together with my comments.

Link to my prior GH5 articles

Curtis Judd’s complete review on the DMW-XLR1 XLR audio interface, and my comments

Kudos to Curtis for his excellent review!

I have the following comments to add, for those who desire to use (a) dynamic microphone(s) with the GH5 (Amazon link, B&H link):

  1. If you don’t already own a portable audio mixer, Beachtek or JuicedLink to pre-boost the dynamic microphone’s lower level (or otherwise prefer the simplicity of not having to carry, power and adjust another device for certain shoots), you can consider using a FetHead (Amazon link, B&H link), which is a pre-preamplifier inside an XLR barrel connector that boosts the output of the dynamic mic about 27 dB to satisfy a weaker preamp in a device like the DMW-XLR1. As covered in prior articles, the FetHead is actually powered via phantom power from the host device, so no extra power supply or power cable is required. As you probably saw and heard in Curtis’s video review above, the DMW-XLR1 XLR audio interface fortunately offers phantom power.
  2. If you do own a portable audio mixer (or Beachtek/JuiceLink) and have no objection to carrying, powering and adjusting it, you may be questioning why you should spend almost US$400 on the DMW-XLR1, considering that you could connect the output of the mixer (or Beachtek/JuiceLink) to the GH5’s 3.5 mm input. Here are 3 justifications:
  • The XLR input offers a more secure physical connection.
  • The balanced XLR input offers a much higher resistance to electromagnetic or RF (radio frequency) interference.
  • 24-bit recording. Panasonic has published that the DMW-XLR1 offers 24-bit recording, but so far, neither Panasonic nor Curtis has said anything about the GH5 being able to record 24-bit audio without the DMW-XLR1. The only portions of the GH5 operator’s manual that make reference to 24-bit audio recording are when it makes direct reference to the optional DMW-XLR1, so it appears that the DMW-XLR1 is a requirement for 24-bit audio recording in the GH5. See my 2015 article: Understanding 24-bit vs 16-bit audio production & distribution to appreciate why it’s better to record raw audio at 24-bit, even though you may not distribute 24-bit audio.

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