Uh-Oh.

Word today from Broadcasting & Cable magazine that Microtune, a manufacturer of digital TV tuner components, has been sampling the competitor’s wares and finding them lacking.

From the article:

“Microtune said its private testing revealed “numerous and pronounced test failures” that could lead to “the loss of television reception in large areas of many metropolitan areas throughout the United States.”

Of course, it would be silly not to recognize that Microtune has an enormous financial stake in the DTV transition. But still…what if they are right? The tuners tested are all on the federally-approved list of DTV tuners (here’s a Wikipedia page with a chart of all of them.) The tested tuners have not (yet) been identified, and the NTIA has announced they will look at Microtune’s data. But still, what is this? Big problem three million in this transition?

I’ve said it a thousand times – I don’t think the DTV transition has been worth it, at all. Agree?


Share:
Bruce A Johnson

Bruce A Johnson

A 1981 graduate of the Boston University College of Communication, Bruce A. Johnson got his first job in broadcast television at WFTV, an ABC affiliate in Orlando, FL. While there, he rose through the ranks from teleprompter operator to videographer, editor, producer and director of many different types of programming. It was in the early 1980’s that he bought his first computer – a Timex/Sinclair 1000 – a device he hated so much, he promptly exchanged it for an Atari 400. But the bug had bitten hard. In 1987, Johnson joined Wisconsin Public Television in Madison as a videographer/editor, and still works there to the present day. His responsibilities have grown, however, and now include research and presentations on the issues surrounding the digital television transition, new consumer technology and the use of public television spectrum in homeland security. He freelances through his company Painted Post MultiMedia, and has written extensively for magazines including DV and Studio Monthly.