Sensor Size Described…

…as best I’ve ever seen it.

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On the left, a 2/3″ Sony HDW-750 HDCam camcorder…on the right, a Sony NEX-EA50H APS-C camcorder.

In the process of writing the First Look on the large-sensor Sony NEX-EA50H camera, I went fishing around the Web for good charts defining actual imaging chip sizes. And this is the best one I found:

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In fact, here’s the link to the actual webpage , kindly provided by Jon Fry of Creative Video over in the UK. If you are reading this across the pond, give them a shout!

Now check out the picture up at the top. On the left is a Sony HDCam camcorder I use on a regular basis. The little blue glow inside the lens mount is the 2/3″ imaging chip – the modern standard for TV production. (Third column on the chart.) When it was new (in about 2006), this camcorder (with lens) cost in excess of $60,000 US. On the right is the new Sony NEX-EA50H camcorder, with six times the imaging space (fifth column on the chart.) Not quite 35mm, of course, but an enormous step up. And a street price of $3600? Wow.


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Bruce A Johnson

Bruce A Johnson

A 1981 graduate of the Boston University College of Communication, Bruce A. Johnson got his first job in broadcast television at WFTV, an ABC affiliate in Orlando, FL. While there, he rose through the ranks from teleprompter operator to videographer, editor, producer and director of many different types of programming. It was in the early 1980’s that he bought his first computer – a Timex/Sinclair 1000 – a device he hated so much, he promptly exchanged it for an Atari 400. But the bug had bitten hard. In 1987, Johnson joined Wisconsin Public Television in Madison as a videographer/editor, and still works there to the present day. His responsibilities have grown, however, and now include research and presentations on the issues surrounding the digital television transition, new consumer technology and the use of public television spectrum in homeland security. He freelances through his company Painted Post MultiMedia, and has written extensively for magazines including DV and Studio Monthly.