Mark Spencer – ProVideo Coalition http://www.provideocoalition.com A Moviola Company Tue, 21 Feb 2017 22:06:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.2 http://provideocoalition.moviola.netdna-cdn.com/app/uploads/cropped-Moviola-Favicon-2016-32x32.png Mark Spencer – ProVideo Coalition http://www.provideocoalition.com 32 32 Creating custom camera archives in Final Cut Pro X http://www.provideocoalition.com/creating-custom-camera-archives-final-cut-pro-x/ http://www.provideocoalition.com/creating-custom-camera-archives-final-cut-pro-x/#comments Wed, 15 Feb 2017 16:27:37 +0000 http://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=45879 We are back after a short break! This week on MacBreak Studio, Steve Martin from Ripple Training shows us how you can create custom camera archives with Final Cut Pro X. We have discussed the benefit of creating camera archives before importing your footage in previous MacBreak Studio episodes so if you aren’t aware of the

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We are back after a short break! This week on MacBreak Studio, Steve Martin from Ripple Training shows us how you can create custom camera archives with Final Cut Pro X.

We have discussed the benefit of creating camera archives before importing your footage in previous MacBreak Studio episodes so if you aren’t aware of the benefits, check those out first here, here, and here.

In this episode, Steve takes the concept of camera archives to a whole new level. One of the key benefits of creating archives, rather than simply dragging movie files from a camera card to a hard drive, is that you can import just ranges of clips from an archive, just like you can directly from the camera card itself. This is because a camera archive is a bit-for-bit clone of your card structure, so Final Cut Pro X sees it as a camera card. If you only want to grab a few selects from very long clips, this ability is invaluable.

But what if your card contains a bunch of irrelevant or redundant clips? Personally, I often leave old clips on my card as a backup, only deleting them when I need the space, so I don’t want to make an archive that includes those clips. Or perhaps you’d like to add some relevant material from another card or some other source to your archive.

The process is simple: first make a copy of your entire card to a drive. Then open the copy, and freely delete any video clips you don’t want. Then you can add video clips, audio files, and even images to the copied card structure.

In Final Cut Pro X, in the Import window, the copied card will appear in the Devices section as a folder. If selected, the Create Archive button becomes clickable because Final Cut sees this folder as a camera card.

Once you create the archive, it will appear in the Favorites section. You now have a backup of your customized media set, and you can import from it as normal, including importing just select ranges from any clips, including clips you added to the folder. Very clever! Check it all out above. If you want to get faster at working with Final Cut Pro X, be sure to check out Ripple Training’s Warp Speed Editing tutorial.

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Audio Editing Shortcuts in Final Cut Pro 10.3 http://www.provideocoalition.com/audio-editing-shortcuts-final-cut-pro-10-3/ http://www.provideocoalition.com/audio-editing-shortcuts-final-cut-pro-10-3/#comments Thu, 05 Jan 2017 16:43:42 +0000 http://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=43925 This week on MacBreak Studio, I show Ripple Training’s Steve Martin some tips for making audio editing in Final Cut Pro 10.3 faster and easier. There are several new audio commands in version 10.3 that are very useful, but they don’t have keyboard shortcuts by default. Luckily it’s very easy to add your own, which

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This week on MacBreak Studio, I show Ripple Training’s Steve Martin some tips for making audio editing in Final Cut Pro 10.3 faster and easier.

There are several new audio commands in version 10.3 that are very useful, but they don’t have keyboard shortcuts by default. Luckily it’s very easy to add your own, which is exactly what I’ve done to make these commands even more powerful.

First up is toggling the new audio lanes feature on and off. Normally, you need to first open the Timeline Index, then click the Show Audio Lanes button. But since there is a command in the Command Editor associated with this button, we can invoke it with a keyboard shortcut. I use Shift-L for this purpose. So now when editing I can keep my audio lanes collapsed for a more condensed view that makes the most of screen real estate, but whenever I want to view my audio organized into lanes by parent role (e.g., Dialogue, Effect, Music), it’s just a tap away.

Next, we move to applying fades to audio clips. Previously, you had to drag the fade handles on each side of a clip to accomplish this. Now, we have commands to apply fades to both sides of a clip or just the head or just the tail, and these commands work on multiple clips at the same time if they are selected. Once again, however, they do not have keyboard shortcuts by default. I assigned Option-Command-F to apply Fades, and Shift-Option-Command-F to remove them – so adding the Shift key does the opposite. Then, for applying a fade to just the head of a clip, I assigned Control-Option-F. Adding the Shift key, Shift-Control-Option-F, adds the fade to the tail end of a selected clip or clips. Pressing either command again will remove the fade.

You can also assign a default fade duration in Preferences. Now, by combining these keyboard shortcuts with the new Select Above and Select Below command (Command Up or Down Arrow), you can very quickly select a clip and add fades without ever touching the mouse.

Finally, I add a keyboard shortcut (Option-A) to the new Align Audio to Video command and show how that command can be used.

Check out the video above to see it in action. If you want to learn more about sound editing in Final Cut Pro 10.3, we have a brand new tutorial for you.

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Using the Align To behavior in Motion 5.3 http://www.provideocoalition.com/using-align-behavior-motion-5-3/ http://www.provideocoalition.com/using-align-behavior-motion-5-3/#respond Wed, 21 Dec 2016 16:48:33 +0000 http://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=43316 This week on MacBreak Studio, I show Ripple Training’s Steve Martin a new feature in Motion 5.3. The Motion update isn’t nearly as extensive as the Final Cut Pro X update, but it does sport a new user interface that matches the looks of Final Cut Pro 10.3, including the rearrangement of several UI elements.

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This week on MacBreak Studio, I show Ripple Training’s Steve Martin a new feature in Motion 5.3.

The Motion update isn’t nearly as extensive as the Final Cut Pro X update, but it does sport a new user interface that matches the looks of Final Cut Pro 10.3, including the rearrangement of several UI elements. Beyond that, there are several new features. In this episode, I focus on the new Align To behavior.

In essence, the Align To behavior aligns any edge, center, or anchor point of any layer or group to the same of any other layer or group. Once aligned, the objects are “stuck” to each other when moved, scaled, or rotated.

The behavior can be animated by automatically moving and rotating objects from their original positions into the aligned position. Like other behaviors, you can change how the animation unfolds, with constantly velocity or easing at either or both ends. The duration of the animation is controlled by the duration of the behavior.

If one of the aligned objects is a text layer, there are even more align options available, such as the baseline of the text, ascenders, descenders, and more.

In the example above, I align a simple rectangle shape to some text. I then use the link behavior that has a new feature that allow you to link the width and/or height of an object (the Shape size in this example) to the width and/or height of a text string (the Object size). This new feature, when combined with the align behavior, ensures that the text background always exactly matches the text, no matter the content, font, or size. And the X Offset and Y Offset parameters allow you to add a custom amount of padding in either direction.

The really cool thing about this combination is that you can then publish the title with the background to Final Cut Pro X, where you can easily modify it based on any additional parameters you choose to publish. Check it all out above. If you want to learn more about Motion, we’ve got you covered.

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Role-assigned voiceover in Final Cut Pro 10.3 http://www.provideocoalition.com/role-assigned-voiceover-final-cut-pro-10-3/ http://www.provideocoalition.com/role-assigned-voiceover-final-cut-pro-10-3/#respond Wed, 14 Dec 2016 16:40:37 +0000 http://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=42984 This week on MacBreak Studio, Ripple Training’s Steve Martin shows us how you can assign roles automatically when recording voiceover in Final Cut Pro X. The ability to record voiceover directly into Final Cut itself is not new, and the command can be found under the Window menu. There, you can choose a microphone source,

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This week on MacBreak Studio, Ripple Training’s Steve Martin shows us how you can assign roles automatically when recording voiceover in Final Cut Pro X.

The ability to record voiceover directly into Final Cut itself is not new, and the command can be found under the Window menu. There, you can choose a microphone source, decide if you want to monitor the audio, and adjust the gain. There is an optional countdown before recording starts, you can choose to mute the project while recording, and you can even create an Audition that contains each of your takes. These three features are checked on by default, and I tend to use all three.

The new feature in this dialog is a Role pop-up menu, in which you can assign any available sub-role. Since roles and sub-roles are Library-specific, anything that you have created for the current library will appear in this list, including roles assigned automatically upon import from iXML data embedded in clips.

In Steve’s demo above, he first expands his audio lanes so that each role is placed in its own lane. He then chooses his previously created “Voiceover” role from the Record Voiceover dialog, and proceeds to record a new take for the scene. Because his character has his back to the camera, he doesn’t have to worry about matching the lip movements, making his job much easier.

After recording, the new audio clip is automatically assigned the correct role, and appears in the lane for that role. He didn’t show it, but if he were to record again, the new recording would be added to the same location as another clip inside a new audition clip so that he could then easily switch between the different takes, even during playback, to select the one that works best.

Steve’s fully updated Sound Editing in Final Cut Pro X tutorial should be out next week, so be sure to check it out.

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Importing iXML data into Final Cut Pro 10.3 http://www.provideocoalition.com/importing-ixml-data-final-cut-pro-10-3/ http://www.provideocoalition.com/importing-ixml-data-final-cut-pro-10-3/#respond Thu, 08 Dec 2016 14:33:32 +0000 http://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=42697 This week on MacBreak Studio, Ripple Training’s Steve Martin shows us how you can now automatically assign roles when importing audio that is tagged with iXML data. In Final Cut Pro 10.3, roles are assigned automatically by default to video, titles, dialogue, music, or effects, with Final Cut making it’s best guess based on the

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This week on MacBreak Studio, Ripple Training’s Steve Martin shows us how you can now automatically assign roles when importing audio that is tagged with iXML data.

In Final Cut Pro 10.3, roles are assigned automatically by default to video, titles, dialogue, music, or effects, with Final Cut making it’s best guess based on the clip metadata. You can also manually select from any default roles or any roles you have added to the current library (audio channels will each be assigned a subrole within that selected role).

But you can also tell Final Cut to assign iXML track names if they are available by checking the checkbox in the Import window (by the way, if you enable the same check box in Preferences, under Import, then it will remain checked in the Import window).

This features then begs the question: what exactly is iXML, and what audio recorders can store this iXML data?

Steve explains the former and then shows us a specific, compelling example for the latter: the Zoom F8. It’s a portable 8-channel field recorder with a very reasonable price point (and there’s a more economical 4-channel version as well). You name your audio inputs via dials and buttons and an LCD screen.

While the ability to capture iXML data is not new, the price points of field recorders that can do so have fallen to within reach of many more producers. Coupled with Final Cut’s ability to automatically recognize and assign that data on import means you are able to get editing immediately.

And here’s an additional tip straight from the Final Cut Pro 10.3 Help document: you can use the manual override setting and the iXML method together. For example, if role override is set to a custom role named “Location Sound” and “Assign iXML track names if available” is selected, imported clips will be assigned the “Location Sound” role, and subroles will be created from the iXML track names and assigned to the corresponding audio components. All of this occurs automatically on import, and the setting is retained for future import operations.

Check it all out above. To learn more about how to get the most out of Final Cut Pro X, check out all of Ripple Training’s tutorials.

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Delete Selection Only in Final Cut Pro X http://www.provideocoalition.com/delete-selection-final-cut-pro-x/ http://www.provideocoalition.com/delete-selection-final-cut-pro-x/#comments Thu, 01 Dec 2016 18:16:22 +0000 http://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=42482 This week on MacBreak Studio, Ripple Training’s Steve Martin shows us how he edits audio with the new “Delete Selection Only” command. If you’ve been using Final Cut Pro X for awhile, you may have been surprised (and very possibly annoyed) when you went to delete a range of an audio clip after updating to

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This week on MacBreak Studio, Ripple Training’s Steve Martin shows us how he edits audio with the new “Delete Selection Only” command.

If you’ve been using Final Cut Pro X for awhile, you may have been surprised (and very possibly annoyed) when you went to delete a range of an audio clip after updating to version 10.3.

Because while pressing the Delete key after selecting an entire video clip, audio clip, or audio component will remove that clip or component, and it will also remove a selected range of a video clip, if you’ve created a range on an audio-only clip or an audio component, pressing the Delete key will instead now disable that range rather than deleting it. In terms long-term editors will recognize, it is essentially perform a lift rather than an extract (although it’s more accurate to say it’s disabling the clip because you can toggle the clip back on again with the Delete key or by tapping the V key).

Both Steve and I edit voiceover extensively and we were rather distressed by this new behavior. Now, it’s easily remedied: adding the Command and Option keys before pressing the Delete key will remove (extract) an audio range. But Steve came up with a better solution.

The command is called “Delete Selection Only”, and can be found in the Command Editor (Final Cut Pro > Commands > Customize). Steve reassigns this command to the “D” key. Although the D key is already used for performing overwrite edits, he rarely performs these types of edits (thanks to connected clips), so he was willing to give it up for the convenience of using a single key stroke for this oft-repeated maneuver.

Once assigned, pressing D will perform a proper extract on the select range. By combining this command with J-K-L to navigate the timeline and I and O to set a range, you can very quickly clean up voiceover and other audio without ever touching the mouse. Watch Steve show us how he does it above.

To learn more about Final Cut Pro X, check out all our tutorials.

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Advanced mixing with Roles in Final Cut Pro 10.3 http://www.provideocoalition.com/advanced-mixing-roles-final-cut-pro-10-3/ http://www.provideocoalition.com/advanced-mixing-roles-final-cut-pro-10-3/#respond Tue, 22 Nov 2016 17:08:40 +0000 http://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=41846 This week on MacBreak Studio, Sam Mestman from Lumaforge returns to share a great tip for add effects to audio in Final Cut Pro 10.3. If you have watched our free overview tutorials, you’ll know how audio components are assigned to subroles within a role, and can be organized into lanes which makes it easy to

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This week on MacBreak Studio, Sam Mestman from Lumaforge returns to share a great tip for add effects to audio in Final Cut Pro 10.3.

If you have watched our free overview tutorials, you’ll know how audio components are assigned to subroles within a role, and can be organized into lanes which makes it easy to identify all the audio clips in your project based on both color and location in a lane. Plus, you can display the role names instead of, or in addition to, the clip name.

When it comes to applying effects to your audio, sometimes you want to apply one to a single component of a single clip, or all components of a clip; sometimes to all the audio within a specific subrole, and sometimes to all the audio in a overall role group. Final Cut Pro lets you do each of these, and lets you easily move back and forth between each of these levels to make additional tweaks at the clip/component level, the subrole level, and the role level.

For a simple example, let’s say you’ve recorded dialog between two actors with two separate microphones, one for each actor: Steve and Jill. You can adjust each of Steve’s audio clips independently, perhaps to fix a levels issue on a clip. But you can also apply a single audio effect on all of Steve’s audio at one time by creating a compound clip of your timeline and choosing to reveal subroles. All of Steve’s audio clips will appear as a single “subrole component” to which you can apply effects (like EQ) and make overall level and panning adjustments. And you can still go into the compound clip to adjust clips individually.

But how do you then apply an audio effect, like a compressor, to the entire dialog role, which includes both Steve and Jill’s audio? If you switch your compound clip view from subroles back to roles to view “role components”, you will lose your subrole effects. Instead, as Sam demonstrates, simply make a new compound clip out of your current compound clip. Now you will have a single role component for all of the dialog. You can apply your effect to all dialog, and still have the flexibility to dive into the subrole component or the individual clips as needed.

Check it all out above. To learn more about the new features in Final Cut Pro 10.3, check out our In-Depth training.

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The audio signal path in Final Cut Pro 10.3 http://www.provideocoalition.com/audio-signal-path-final-cut-pro-10-3/ http://www.provideocoalition.com/audio-signal-path-final-cut-pro-10-3/#respond Thu, 17 Nov 2016 16:00:43 +0000 http://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=41661 This week on MacBreak Studio, Steve Martin from Ripple Training explains how Final Cut Pro 10.3 now handles your audio signal path. While you may already be familiar with the ways you can now assign roles on import (or after), customize subroles, organize roles into lanes, and mix based on roles, once you start applying

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This week on MacBreak Studio, Steve Martin from Ripple Training explains how Final Cut Pro 10.3 now handles your audio signal path.

While you may already be familiar with the ways you can now assign roles on import (or after), customize subroles, organize roles into lanes, and mix based on roles, once you start applying effects to clips and clip components, it’s important to understand how Final Cut Pro X handles those effects.

Steve starts by showing us how to take a 5.1 surround sound clip and break it into its separate components in order to adjust each separately. So, for example, you can take audio from one of the 6 channels and pan it exactly where you want in the 5.1 space, and even automate the panning to change over time, moving from speaker to speaker.

He then applies effects to both the clip and the component levels. This is where things get interesting. In earlier versions of Final Cut Pro, if you had a clip with multiple audio components (for example, microphones from two separate people), Final Cut would mix those components together to create a single output for that clip. But now, that no longer happens: as long as no effects are applied at the clip level, every clip keeps a separate output for each subrole. So if you apply an effect to a component – for example, a compressor on the mic for one speaker – it maintains that effect on that subrole throughout the mix. This is also true for effects applied to subrole components in a compound clip.

However, if you apply an effect at the clip level, so that it affects all subroles within the clip, the audio components are mixed together through that effect. Apple calls these “mixdown effects”, and Final Cut adds a mixdown icon on the clip in both the Timeline and in the Inspector to remind you that there is at least one effect apply at the clip level.

If all the audio components in the clip are in the same parent role, than the audio is routed through the parent role – for example, Dialogue or Effects. But if your clip has subroles from multiple parent roles, then Final Cut creates a new parent role called Mixed Audio.

This new signal path behavior is powerful because it allows you to maintain integrity to your effects applied to specific subroles. Check it all out above. To get deeper into audio and all the new features of Final Cut Pro 10.3, check out our In-Depth training.

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Select above and below in Final Cut Pro 10.3 http://www.provideocoalition.com/select-final-cut-pro-10-3/ http://www.provideocoalition.com/select-final-cut-pro-10-3/#respond Tue, 08 Nov 2016 16:35:18 +0000 http://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=41231 This week on MacBreak Studio, Steve Martin from Ripple Training shows us one of his favorite new features in Final Cut Pro 10.3. While you have probably already heard about and explored the big changes in the 10.3 update like the new UI, Timeline 2, new Role functionality including mixing with roles, fast audio fades,

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This week on MacBreak Studio, Steve Martin from Ripple Training shows us one of his favorite new features in Final Cut Pro 10.3.

While you have probably already heard about and explored the big changes in the 10.3 update like the new UI, Timeline 2, new Role functionality including mixing with roles, fast audio fades, workflow improvements, wide gamut color support, and Motion template integration into the library, you may not know about a host of other less-known improvements and enhancements.

The feature Steve demonstrates today allows you to select any clip under the playhead with a keyboard shortcut: Command plus the up or down arrow key. Tapping the arrow key will move the selection through all clips under the playhead. While it may seem rather unremarkable at first, this little shortcut allows for a variety of interesting workflows that are fast and easy. Steve shows us three examples.

First, when you have multiple connected audio clips, like music, sound effects, b-roll audio, etc. in addition to nat sound, it’s now so fast to select just the audio you want to work with without taking your hands off the keyboard. Once selected, you can adjust levels, mute, nudge, trim, and more, also all with keyboard shortcuts – and, all while the project continues to play, if you’d like.

Next, Steve shows us how he can color correct both a clip on the primary storyline and a connected clip quickly with this shortcut, allowing him to stay focused on the viewer and the inspector rather than clicking around in the timeline.

And finally he works on a motion graphics composite, easily moving between composited layers, adjust color and other attributes of each selected clip, even while the project plays.

These Select Above and Select Below commands, as they are called, are just one more improvement that will make you a faster editor because they allow you to focus on creative decision making. If you want to get the full low-down on all the new features in Final Cut Pro 10.3, check out our What’s New In-Depth training. Or if you are new to Final Cut Pro X, our new 10.3 Core Training is the best place to start.

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Final Cut Pro 10.3 is here http://www.provideocoalition.com/final-cut-pro-10-3/ http://www.provideocoalition.com/final-cut-pro-10-3/#comments Thu, 27 Oct 2016 18:51:48 +0000 http://www.provideocoalition.com/?p=40736 Today Apple announced the immediate availability of Final Cut Pro X, version 10.3. It’s a huge update with a broad variety of new features, including a refined user interface, a massive update to how roles work including color coding, lane organization, easy expanding, collapsing, focusing on roles and role components, and role-based mixing. 10.3 also

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Today Apple announced the immediate availability of Final Cut Pro X, version 10.3.

It’s a huge update with a broad variety of new features, including a refined user interface, a massive update to how roles work including color coding, lane organization, easy expanding, collapsing, focusing on roles and role components, and role-based mixing. 10.3 also adds wide gamut color support, support for more camera formats, and a variety of browsing, editing, and effects improvements. Our blog article goes into all the details, and includes the 8 free feature overview movies embedded below (plus a video on how to upgrade). For more information, be sure to check out our What’s New In-Depth tutorial.

If you are brand new to Final Cut Pro X, then the best place to get started is our free Getting Started lessons and our Core Training.

Exploring the Final Cut Pro 10.3 UI

Exploring Timeline 2

Assigning Roles & Subroles

Role Based Audio Mixing

Warp Speed Audio Editing

Effects Improvements

Wide Gamut Color Support

Consolidating Motion Projects

How to Upgrade

Ugrading to FCP 10.3 – YouTube

All features of 10.3 are covered in more detail in our What’s New In-Depth tutorial.

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