Early Media Composer and Final Cut Pro promo videos

And one from Media 100. See how far you NLE software has come.

I got taken down into one of those You Tube time sucks the other day. It came courtesy of a couple of tweets by Rob G Wilson that pointed to some very old Avid Media Composer and Final Cut Pro promo videos. If you want to realize just how far your NLE software has advanced then give yourself 20 minutes to check these things out. They are full of bad music, cheesy video effects and plenty of bad hair. Those two videos as well as a an early promo for Media 100 are embedded after the jump. 

This was the tweet from Rob about the Avid Media Composer promo (The twitter embeds may or may not show the YouTube video so the seperate YouTube embed is here too):

And here it is in all of its standard def glory:

Next came this tweet from Rob about the early Final Cut Pro promo:

And of course the video:

If you're wondering why the early Media Composer looks so much more primitive than the early Final Cut Pro remember that the Media Composer video says it is from 1989, a full decade before the FCP video in 1999. And then at some point (maybe around 1996) came Media 100. This is their promo video:

Media 100 is still around. It is owned by Boris FX and you can buy it for $1,000. There's a free trial available too. If you read over those bullet points it really looks quite powerful. I wonder if anyone is actually using it these days?

I tried to find an early Adobe Premiere promo video as well but I was not successful.

If you're at all curious about the history of non-linear editing software then check out the Timeline books by John Buck. They dig into the history of editing.

Timeline 2 covers the years from 1988 to 2000 so that'll be a good read if the above videos were of interest.

Scott Simmons

Scott Simmons

Scott Simmons was born in rural West Tennessee and didn’t really realize that movies and tv had to be made by actual people until he went to college. After getting degrees in both Television Production and Graphic Design he was in one of the early graduating classes at the Watkins Film School in Nashville, Tennessee. During that time at Watkins he discovered editing. While most of his classmates in film school wanted to be directors, Scott saw real career opportunities in post production and took a job as an assistant editor after completing film school. In 1999, Scott took the leap into freelancing and in 2007 accepted a position as an editor at Filmworkers – Nashville. In 2005 Scott created The Editblog a website dedicated to all things editing and post-production which is now housed here at PVC. Someday he hopes to edit on a beach with a touch screen device, a wireless hard drive and a Red Stripe.